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Guardianship

NM Guardianship Cases - Plan Ahead with a Trust

By | Guardianship | No Comments

New Mexico’s guardianship and conservatorship cases are clouded in secrecy.  Once decisions are made by the court, family members are effectively locked out of receiving information.  And in many instances, this has huge economic effects on the estate.

In November, 2016, the Albuquerque Journal did a five-part investigative series, “Who Guards the Guardians.” (https://www.abqjournal.com/896535/guardians.html and http://kanw.com/who-guards-guardians-podcast).  The series revealed a major flaw in the current system, where the secrecy and seeming lack of accountability depleted a $5 million estate down to $750,000 by the time she passed.  The secrecy is designed to “protect” the ward (the person who is incapacitated), because there are times when it is the family members who are trying to take advantage of the vulnerabilities.  But there needs to be better checks and balances in place.

At Morris Hall, we have always felt that by utilizing a revocable living trust as the cornerstone of your estate plan, you and your family will avoid the issues associated with a guardianship, conservatorship, and probate generally.  More importantly, we feel that having the trust put in place is only step one.  We assist our clients in fully funding the trust – ensuring there are no assets left outside of the trust.  We also strongly encourage regular estate plan reviews.  This not only helps ensure the plan does what you think it does, and what you need it to, but it also creates a documented history of your intent.

There have been reforms to the system attempted in the past, but they seem to stall (see https://www.abqjournal.com/967595/guardianship-reforms-doa-in-nm.html).  The goal, seemingly, is to make one set of comprehensive changes, rather than to add smaller fixes, then revisit over time.

Recently, the Albuquerque Journal published a follow-up (https://www.abqjournal.com/1088373/estate-planning-questioned-in-guardianship-hearing.html) piece indicating our State Legislature is trying to pass legislation that puts into law what we have always felt.  The proposed legislation will make it so a court cannot ignore a valid trust.  If passed, this law will provide additional safeguards for all of you who took the proactive measures and planned your estates.

Having a revocable living trust is important to make a difficult time easier.  And in New Mexico today, it is still your first line of defense from getting you and your estate dragged into the overworked, overburdened court system.  Come see us today to have your estate plan, including a revocable living trust, reviewed or put in place.

Do I need a Guardianship or Conservatorship Over My Mom?

By | Elder Care, Elder Law, Estate Planning, Guardianship | No Comments

We can’t make financial or health decisions for another person without proper planning or a court order.  This is true even for our closest of relatives – our parents, our adult children.

I recently met with “Bill” who explained that his 80 year old mother’s memory was deteriorating over the last 6 months. It is worse because Bill’s mother had hoarder tendencies.  Bill explained that his mother’s home was dangerous because she had kept every newspaper, magazine and financial statement she received over the past 40 years. Bill even noticed a pile of unopened bills and other mail on the kitchen counter.

Bill had talked with his mother about his concerns regarding her forgetfulness and safety, and she agreed that something just wasn’t right. Bill took his mother to her doctor and the doctor determined that she was not fit to make her own health and financial decisions.

Bill came to me to find out how he could help his mom with her living arrangements, as well as her finances.

Unfortunately Bill’s mother had never completed any estate planning documents, and because she lacked capacity, the only course of action to grant Bill the power to help would be to start on a court proceeding – a Guardianship/Conservatorship.  The court would rule who is in charge of the person (i.e. health decisions) via the Guardianship and who is charge of the finances via the Conservatorship.

The court process of a Guardianship and Conservatorship is time consuming, public, expensive and can be humiliating. The judge will appoint the person who has the best interest of Bill’s mother. For example, if Bill and his sister Susan want to each be their mother’s Guardian/Conservator, but do not want to act together, the judge, in his own opinion, will have to choose which one would act in the best interest of their mother. The cost of an average proceeding is approximately $5,000-$8,000.  Then on an annual basis, the appointed guardian and conservator is required to report to the court on the status of the incapacitated person – adding more cost.  All of this money is coming from the incapacitated person; money that can be better used caring for her.

If you are over the age of 18, you must have healthcare and financial powers of attorney nominating an agent who will handle your affairs – a person that you know and trust. If you fail to plan, your loved ones will be forced to initiate a Guardianship/Conservatorship proceeding should you become incapacitated before you pass away.

Call us today to meet with one of our estate planning attorneys to get your (or a family member’s) plan in place.

Wendy-Harn-Photo  Contributed by Morris Hall, PLLC Tucson and Oro Valley Estate Planning Attorney and Partner, Wendy W. Harn.

What the Attorneys of Morris Hall, PLLC Can Do For You:
The attorneys at Morris Hall have 100’s of years of combined experience ensuring that families’ assets are protected from probate, unnecessary taxes, creditors, ex-spouses and Medicaid spend-down.  Our Arizona offices are located in Phoenix, Mesa, Scottsdale, Carefree, Tucson, Oro Valley, Prescott, Flagstaff and Arrowhead.  Our New Mexico offices are located in Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Santa Fe.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

 

Why You Need a Living Trust

By | Estate Planning, Guardianship | No Comments

In this fourth and final installment of my four-part series on why you need a living trust, I will look at why the fourth reason offered by the aforementioned business publication doesn’t make any sense.

~ There may be unforeseen consequences ~

The article states that having a trust where you and/or your spouse is named the trustee can create problems if either of you become incapacitated.  The article notes that under such circumstances, your family members may be forced to have you or your spouse declared incompetent to gain access to your finances.

The article fails to note that the same issues can arise if you don’t have a living trust.  If you and your spouse become incapacitated, and neither of you have a trust, who has the authority to access your finances?  A child cannot simply enter a bank and claim authority to financial accounts based solely on a bloodline relationship.  The bank will require proof of authority.  Under those circumstances, your child might say to the bank: “well, my parents don’t have a trust, but they have a last will and I am the personal representative of the will; therefore, I have authority over their finances.”  What your child doesn’t realize is that a last will only becomes effective at death.  Thus, your child will still need authority to access your accounts.  Authority can be given through a power of attorney that names your child as agent (which may still require proof of incapacity), or in court documents that name the child as conservator.

In addition, what if you and your spouse never regain capacity and ultimately pass away without a will or a living trust?  Your assets will pass through “intestate succession” – a process where state law dictates where your stuff goes.

Whether you have a trust or not, there will always be unforeseen circumstances.  A living trust will not stop these unforeseen circumstances from happening, but it is the best vehicle to mitigate the damage caused by them.

darren-richardson  Contributed by Morris Hall PLLC Phoenix Estate Planning Attorney, Darren L. Richardson.

About Morris Hall, PLLC:
At Morris Hall, PLLC we have focused our legal practice on estate planning for over 45 years.  Along with estate planning, our attorneys help clients and their families with matters of probate, trust administration, wills, power of attorneys, business planning, succession planning, legacy planning, charitable gifting and other important legal aspects.  We also have divisions in financial, real estate and accounting to help you incorporate all of your planning together, ensuring that everything works perfectly for your needs and situation. Our Arizona offices are located in Phoenix, Mesa, Scottsdale, Carefree, Tucson, Oro Valley, Prescott, Sedona, Flagstaff and Arrowhead.  Our New Mexico offices are located in Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Santa Fe.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

 

Planning for Incapacity

By | Attorney Andrea Claus, Elder Law, Estate Planning, Guardianship | No Comments

The thought of incapacity is unpleasant, thus many people fail to plan for the consequences of incapacitation.  Incapacity can be the result of Alzheimer’s disease or dementia, but it can also happen suddenly due to a stroke or an accident.  The issues that surround incapacity are not limited to medical decisions; there is a financial component as well.

If you are unable to manage your assets and do not have documents addressing incapacity, your family may have to seek a conservatorship from the probate court.  A conservatorship is a probate proceeding that appoints someone (a conservator) to control an incapacitated person’s property if they have no power of attorney.  The court will order a conservatorship under  two general circumstances: 1) if a person is unable to manage his estate and affairs effectively for reasons related to physical or mental incapacity; or 2) the person has property that will be wasted or an estate that will be dissipated unless proper management is put in place.

If the incapacitated person doesn’t have planning documents in place, and a dispute arises within the family, the court might appoint a non-family member to manage the incapacitated person’s assets.  Creating a power of attorney and putting a living trust in place can address these issues and avoid court involvement.  To discuss these or other estate planning issues, contact one of the attorneys at Morris Hall for a free consultation.

andrea-claus  Contributed by Morris Hall, PLLC  Phoenix and Prescott Estate Planning Attorney, Andrea L. Claus.

About Morris Hall, PLLC:
At Morris Hall, PLLC we have focused our legal practice on estate planning for over 45 years.  Along with estate planning, our attorneys help clients and their families with matters of probate, trust administration, wills, power of attorneys, business planning, succession planning, legacy planning, charitable gifting and other important legal aspects.  We also have divisions in financial, real estate and accounting to help you incorporate all of your planning together, ensuring that everything works perfectly for your needs and situation. Our Arizona offices are located in Phoenix, Mesa, Scottsdale, Carefree, Tucson, Oro Valley, Prescott, Sedona, Flagstaff and Arrowhead.  Our New Mexico offices are located in Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Santa Fe.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

Tom Brokaw’s Living Will:

By | Attorney David Eastman, Guardianship, Healthcare documents, Living Will | No Comments

The purpose of this blog is to recommend every American to outline directives for doctors to follow if they were ever in a Terry Schiavo situation.  If you are unfamiliar with the Terry Schiavo case, a quick summary here will suffice:

 

Terry Schiavo suffered a cardiac arrest in her home in Florida in 1990.  She suffered major brain damage as a result. Her doctors diagnosed her as being in a persistent vegetative state. From 1998 to 2005, her husband and parents engaged in a fierce legal battle over whether to keep her on life support or not.  The legal fees to settle this matter were in excess of $1 million. Finally, on March 18, 2005, after 14 appeals and numerous motions, petitions, and hearings in the Florida courts; and after five suits in federal district court; struck down legislation by the Supreme Court of Florida; enactment of federal legislation (the Palm Sunday Compromise); and four denials of certiorari from the Supreme Court of the United States, the feeding tubes were removed.

Everyone in a persistent vegetative state should have the right to decide how they want their life to end.  We should never have the courts or the government interfering with this life decision.  The best way to insure that your wishes will be carried out, should you be in a Terry Schiavo situation, is to have a Living Will in place.

A Living Will is a physician’s directive that tells doctors whether you do or don’t want to be kept on life support if you are in a persistent vegetative state.  A Living Will would have prevented the courts and government from meddling in Terry Schiavo’s personal matters, had a Living Will been prepared prior to her cardiac arrest.

 

Once you have created your Living Will, it is critical to then talk to your loved ones about your wishes and how you want those wishes carried out. It is also vital that your loved ones know where your Living Will and other estate planning documents are kept. In an article titled, Do Your Clients Have the Same Problems as Tom Brokaw?, Randi Siegel, President of DocuBank, talks about where and how these documents should be kept so they can be accessed by your loved ones in times of emergency.

To be kept on life support is a personal decision.  It is a decision that you should make while you have the mental capacity to make such decisions; it should not be made by some government official or judge. Please take the time to have this important document created for you and your loved ones.  Please call us to schedule an appointment so we can create a living will for you and your loved ones.

dave-eastmanContributed by Morris Hall, PLLC Arrowhead, Scottsdale and Phoenix Estate Planning Attorney and Partner, David T. Eastman.

Why Choose Morris Hall, PLLC:
You have a number of options when it comes to estate planning, so why pick Morris Hall?  First off, estate planning and asset protection are a very complicated endeavor and you should only trust someone who focuses exclusively on those matters.  Also, Morris Hall is a proud member of The American Academy of Estate Planning Attorneys (AAEPA) which provides us additional support, advanced training, tools and information that is not available to others – which means that we can better protect your assets and your loved ones.  We are one of only three firms in Arizona that belong to the AAEPA and are the only firm in New Mexico that has been granted membership.  If you have assets and loved ones that you want to protect, you are in good hands with Morris Hall.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

The King’s Estate – B.B. King, That Is

By | Estate Planning, Estate taxes, Guardianship, Healthcare documents, Living Will | No Comments
SAN RAFAEL, CA - FEBRUARY 26: B.B. King performs at Marin Center on February 26, 2014 in San Rafael, California. (Photo by Steve Jennings/WireImage)

SAN RAFAEL, CA - FEBRUARY 26: B.B. King performs at Marin Center on February 26, 2014 in San Rafael, California. (Photo by Steve Jennings/WireImage)

Even before blues legend B. B. King passed on May 15, 2015 at the age of 89, dark clouds hung over his estimated $10 million estate.

King is survived by eleven of his children, though King granted Power of Attorney to his longtime business manager, Laverne Toney.  About a month ago, one of King’s daughters, Patty King, filed elder abuse charges against Toney.   Ms. King alleged her father needed medical attention and pleaded with Toney to have her father taken to a hospital.  When Toney allegedly refused, police and paramedics were called to the scene..

Three of King’s children, Patty King, Karen Williams, and Rita Washington, had previously filed elder abuse and robbery charges against Toney back in November, claiming Toney had appropriated $20-30 million from their father, had been withholding his medication while on tour, and stolen several Rolex watches and other jewelry valued at $250,000; those charges were ultimately dismissed by the court.

Shirley King, another of King’s daughters, has taken to Facebook throughout this ordeal to publicly voice her outrage at Toney for his poor treatment of her father and allegedly keeping friends and family from seeing King in his final days.

Toney maintains that all of these claims against him are false, the desperate attempts of King’s children to dog-ear as much of their father’s money and future music royalties for themselves.

This is not the legacy that most of us hope to leave behind, and Mr. King’s Estate has not even been opened yet.

There is no amount of fame or money that can protect us from the issues that can arise around the settling an estate. Millions of dollars and good intentions cannot take the place of good, thorough estate planning.  Creating an estate plan can be an uncomfortable thought experiment that many avoid until it is too late.  Plus, once we begin creating an estate plan, many select their agents for Powers of Attorney or Executors based on our current predicaments – when we are able-bodied, in control of many of our affairs, and perhaps have not fully considered whether those we have selected will continue to honor our wishes and best interests when we are no longer there to watch over them.  The simple truth is that it can be hard for all of us to imagine the world without us in it.  Proper consideration and a thorough estate plan can help to minimize these sorts of ugly exchanges among your loved and trusted ones, if not prevent them altogether.

For once we pass, our plans are set in stone, and at that point, as the song goes, the thrill is gone.

 

Contributed by Morris Hall, PLLC, Heidi Harris.

 About Morris Hall, PLLC:
At Morris Hall, PLLC we have focused our legal practice on estate planning for over 45 years.  Along with estate planning, our attorneys help clients and their families with matters of probate, trust administration, wills, power of attorneys, business planning, succession planning, legacy planning, charitable gifting and other important legal aspects.  We also have divisions in financial, real estate and accounting to help you incorporate all of your planning together, ensuring that everything works perfectly for your needs and situation. Our Arizona offices are located in Phoenix, Mesa, Scottsdale, Carefree, Tucson, Oro Valley, Prescott, Flagstaff and Arrowhead.  Our New Mexico offices are located in Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Santa Fe.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

 

 

How Can I Protect My Children’s Inheritances from Divorce or Creditors?

By | Attorney David Eastman, Estate Planning, Guardianship | No Comments

Typically, a will provides that a person’s assets will be distributed to his or her children upon that person’s death.  If a beneficiary trust were used instead of a will, the inheritance can be protected from the ex-spouses or creditors of the beneficiary.  With a beneficiary trust, the beneficiary can control his or her inheritance and decide how the inheritance is invested.  The beneficiary also gets to decide how and when it is spent.  But if the beneficiary were to get a divorce or sued, the inheritance belongs to the trust, and not the beneficiary.  While there are some limitations to the protection a beneficiary trust affords, a qualified estate planning attorney can help maximize your legacy for your family.

dave-eastmanContributed by MH Arrowhead, Scottsdale and Phoenix Estate Planning Attorney and Partner, David T. Eastman.

About Morris Hall:
At Morris Hall, we have focused our legal practice on estate planning for over 40 years.  Along with estate planning, our attorneys help clients and their families with matters of probate, trust administration, wills, power of attorneys, business planning, succession planning, legacy planning, charitable gifting and other important legal aspects.  We also have divisions in financial, real estate and accounting to help you incorporate all of your planning together, ensuring that everything works perfectly for your needs and situation. Our Arizona offices are located in Phoenix, Mesa, Scottsdale, Cave Creek, Tucson, Prescott, Flagstaff and Arrowhead.  Our New Mexico offices are located in Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Santa Fe.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

Non-Tax Reasons for a Estate Plan

By | Estate Planning, Estate taxes, Guardianship, Probate | No Comments

While taxes are an important element of estate planning, especially for those subject to state or federal estate taxes, consider the following important non-tax reasons to plan.

  1. Incapacity.  Are you going to become incapacitated? Of course, we don’t have a crystal ball to tell us the answer, so it’s vital that in order for someone to make your health care decisions, minimal planning is done. For example, executing powers of attorney can allow for others to make your healthcare and financial decisions should you be unable to do so.
  2. Divvying Up Assets and Avoiding Conflict.  Who gets your assets after you pass away? If you want a specific individual or charity to receive any part of your legacy, they must be clearly spelled out in an estate plan; if not, then the state statutes will dictate who is to receive your assets.
  3. Guardians.  A Will is the proper place to nominate guardians to care for minors or incapacitated people (like parents or grandparents) close to you.
  4. Managers.  An estate plan is how you designate who is to control the assets left behind.  For example, in a Trust, you can designate that your sister will manage a certain beneficiary’s assets until the beneficiary reaches a certain age.
  5. Probate. It is a public process which can be time consuming and very expensive. A properly drafted estate plan can avoid both a living probate (incapacity) and death probate (transferring of assets after one passes away).

 

As we head into a new year with possibly many goals to achieve, consider putting estate planning at the top of your goal list.

The attorneys at Morris Hall have 100’s of years of combined experience ensuring that families’ assets are protected from probate, unnecessary taxes, creditors, ex-spouses and Medicaid spend-down.  The attorneys also help those in Arizona and New Mexico to apply for and receive Medicaid assistance and Veterans Benefits.  Our Arizona offices are located in Phoenix, Mesa, Scottsdale, Cave Creek, Tucson, Prescott, Flagstaff and Arrowhead.  Our New Mexico offices are located in Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Santa Fe.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

Protecting Your Children

By | Estate Planning, Guardianship, Healthcare documents, Other | No Comments

My wife and I protect our son.  We may even be called over –protective.  If we can find clothing made out of bubble wrap, we would most likely get an entire wardrobe for him.  Right now, he is only four-years old.  So our protection scheme is very hands on – one of us stays close to be able to spring into protective action.

And as he grows and matures, I can foresee the types of protections will change.  But the protective acts will always remain.  I can see ourselves in the way our parents continue to support and protect us.

So I find it strange when I hear clients insist to not put certain protective language into their trusts.  I have to attribute this to a misunderstanding of what the language provides for their children.

In a traditional plan, when the person passes away, and the children stand to inherit, that inheritance is outright to those children – meaning the child is free to do with the money what he or she wants.  That sounds good, except that in that plan, that inheritance, once in the child’s pocket, is vulnerable to that child’s creditors, to lawsuits, to a divorce and as part of any government support application.

So we can craft a plan that keeps the good, and eliminates the bad – and why wouldn’t anyone want to protect their children from the bad, especially when they have the power to do so.  The good would be that the child can spend the inheritance as he or she pleases; while at the same time the language keeps the outside “bad” away – creditors, lawsuits, divorce and government assistance programs would not be able to get to that money.

To make sure your plan protects your children, please give us a call today to make an appointment, and one of our estate planning attorneys can talk with you as to the best approach to add those protections.

 

Albuquerque, New Mexico Estate Planning Attorney James PlitzContributed by MH Albuquerque, Santa Fe and Las Cruces Estate Planning Attorney, James P. Plitz.

Why Choose Morris Hall:
You have a number of options when it comes to estate planning, so why pick Morris Hall?  First off, estate planning and asset protection are a very complicated endeavor and you should only trust someone who focuses exclusively on those matters.  Also, MH is a proud member of The American Academy of Estate Planning Attorneys (AAEPA) which provides us additional support, advanced training, tools and information that is not available to others – which means that we can better protect your assets and your loved ones.  We are one of only two firms in Arizona that belong to the AAEPA and are the only firm in New Mexico that has been granted membership.  If you have assets and loved ones that you want to protect, you are in good hands with MH.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

What is a Healthcare Power of Attorney?

By | Elder Care, Elder Law, Estate Planning, Guardianship, Healthcare documents | No Comments

A Healthcare Power of Attorney is a powerful document which states who will make your healthcare decisions should you be unable to do so. Let’s take the following example. Sally is driving with her boyfriend, Joe, to go to a musical concert in Phoenix. While on the highway, they get in a car accident which leaves Sally in a coma. Sally is taken to the hospital. Can Joe communicate with the hospital staff? Can Joe make surgery decisions for Sally?

In our example, let’s assume Sally doesn’t have any estate planning documents in place. In Arizona, Joe would have a low priority (see below) in order to have the legal authority to communicate with the doctors and make medical decisions on Sally’s behalf.  In order to bypass the statutory priority, Sally must nominate Joe in a valid Healthcare Power of Attorney for Joe to be able to step into the shoes of Sally and make her healthcare decisions should she be unable to do so temporarily or permanently.

According to Arizona law, absent a valid Healthcare Power of Attorney, the following have priority to make health care decisions for the patient and who shall follow the patient’s wishes if they are known:

1) The patient’s spouse, unless the patient and spouse are legally separated.

2) An adult child of the patient. If the patient has more than one adult child, the health care provider shall seek the consent of a majority of the adult children who are reasonably available for consultation.

3) A parent of the patient.

4) If the patient is unmarried, the patient’s domestic partner.

5) A brother or sister of the patient.

6) A close friend of the patient.

Estate Planning is often thought of as only for the wealthy. However, as the above illustration shows, we never discussed Sally’s estate size. Simple planning with a Healthcare Power of Attorney and other ancillary healthcare documents are vital if you want to be in control of who makes your important healthcare decisions. It’s time to discuss with an experienced estate planning attorney whether your existing plan needs updating, or a plan needs to be created to meet your individual situation.

What the Attorneys of Morris Hall Can Do For You:
The attorneys at Morris Hall have 100’s of years of combined experience ensuring that families’ assets are protected from probate, unnecessary taxes, creditors, ex-spouses and Medicaid spend-down.  The attorneys also help those in Arizona and New Mexico to apply for and receive Medicaid assistance and Veterans Benefits.  Our Arizona offices are located in Phoenix, Mesa, Scottsdale, Cave Creek, Tucson, Prescott, Flagstaff and Arrowhead.  Our New Mexico offices are located in Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Santa Fe.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.