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Attorney Andrea Claus

Make Things Easier for Those Left Behind: Leave a “Map”

By | Attorney Andrea Claus, Beneficiaries, Estate Planning | No Comments

The hardest part in creating your estate plan is seeing the attorney to make sure it is done right.  I want to give the proper kudos to all those I’ve met, those who’ve been diligent in creating a plan and memorializing their final wishes.  Yet many have not listened to my recommended “follow-up” step – communicate with your loved ones.  The most critical piece that needs to be shared is these documents might be found.  This little oversight can be especially worrisome because loved ones don’t often search for estate documents until after the funeral.    At the very least,  leave your loved ones a “map” to help guide them after you’re gone. Without the documents, conflicts can arise between family members as to what a parent or loved one would have wanted.  Further, problems, such as delay and missteps, can continue if you did not leave a current list of assets or the location of important documents.

A map is a tool used to get from one point to another – a tool used to prevent getting lost.  Your map leaves directions or guidelines as to your burial or funeral wishes for your loved ones to follow.  By providing directions to those left behind, you’ve reduced the burden on them to have to decide.  There is no wondering whether something is as you’d have wished, no second-guessing, and the chance for conflict amongst the family is most likely eliminated.

Your map should also provide a list of current assets.  The person whom you’ve charged with settling things after you’ve gone (your ‘executor’) will need to know what you have in order to account for and make your distributions.  By leaving a current list of assets, and clearing out all outdated statements, contracts and policies, you will make that task much easier.  Ensuring that the person you’ve named knows where to access your estate plan and your “map” is of utmost importance.

One of the greatest gifts you can give a loved one is the peace of mind that comes with knowing they’re carrying out your true wishes.  Creating a complete estate plan ensures this, and to leave a “map” will relieve a great burden during a difficult time.  Call for an appointment with a Morris Hall attorney today; we are happy to review your plans and help you outline what all should be in your map.

andrea-claus Contributed by Morris Hall PLLC Phoenix and Prescott Estate Planning Attorney, Andrea L. Claus.

What the Attorneys of Morris Hall, PLLC Can Do For You:
The attorneys at Morris Hall have 100’s of years of combined experience ensuring that families’ assets are protected from probate, unnecessary taxes, creditors, ex-spouses and Medicaid spend-down.  Our Arizona offices are located in Phoenix, Mesa, Scottsdale, Carefree, Tucson, Oro Valley, Prescott, Flagstaff and Arrowhead.  Our New Mexico offices are located in Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Santa Fe.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

Considerations in Planning for a Special Needs Beneficiary: Part I

By | Attorney Andrea Claus, Beneficiaries, Special Needs | No Comments

I met with a prospect the other day, a married couple with 3 adult children.  It was a pretty typical meeting until I reviewed their existing distributions: when the second of them passed, there estate was to be left 50-50 to only two of their three kids.  I asked why they are disinheriting their third child, and their reply was so that he would not lose his government benefits.

I hear that kind of story all of the time. Having a special needs loved one has many ups and many downs.  However, it is important to understand some of the basic rules when it comes to planning for families with special people.  There is so much to go through, I will be writing this in three parts, so look for Part II soon.

Each family I meet with is unique; everyone has their individual concerns when it comes to estate planning. Those planning for a special needs loved one must carefully consider many things when crafting their plan.  A crucial piece of planning information is determining if the special needs beneficiary is in receipt of any type of government benefit or assistance program.  There are different categories of assistance that a special needs individual might qualify for:

The first category is the entitlement programs. They are called entitlement programs because a person does not have to have low income or assets to qualify for them; the person is “entitled” to receive the benefit.  The two most common entitlement programs are Social Security Disability Income (“SSDI”), and Medicare.  There are different ways to qualify for SSDI, but typically special needs persons become eligible under the Childhood Disability Benefits or Disabled Adult Child Program. Since SSDI and Medicare eligibility is not based on income or assets, these programs do not usually need to be considered when developing an estate plan for special needs beneficiaries.

The second category is the “means tested” programs.  There are certain programs and benefits for special needs individuals where that individual’s income and assets are considered.  These “means-tested” programs include Supplemental Security Income (“SSI”), Medicaid, In Home Supportive Services, Subsidized or Section 8 Housing, and Temporary Aid to Needy Families.

For an individual receiving these types of benefits, or in need of these types of benefits, careful planning is necessary-an inheritance can disqualify receipt of the benefit.  Without the proper planning an inheritance will need to be “spent down” to the level where he or she once again qualifies. Since these means-tested programs generally do not allow a person to have more than $2,000 in their name, the receipt of an inheritance will disqualify a special needs beneficiary until he or she has spent the inheritance down to $2,000.

What is intended as a heartfelt gift can do significant damage.  An inheritance of greater than $2,000 has the potential to cause the loss of Medicaid for a special needs beneficiary, which can be devastating since he or she may not be eligible for any other kind of health insurance coverage.

It does not have to be that way.  A properly drafted plan can pass an inheritance of any size to a special needs beneficiary without the loss of benefits, even if it is a means-tested program.  If you have a special needs beneficiary, we can put together a plan that will do what you intend it to: benefit your loved one.

andrea-claus  Contributed by Morris Hall, PLLC Phoenix and Prescott Estate Planning Attorney, Andrea L. Claus.

What the Attorneys of Morris Hall, PLLC Can Do For You:
The attorneys at Morris Hall have 100’s of years of combined experience ensuring that families’ assets are protected from probate, unnecessary taxes, creditors, ex-spouses and Medicaid spend-down.  Our Arizona offices are located in Phoenix, Mesa, Scottsdale, Carefree, Tucson, Oro Valley, Prescott, Flagstaff and Arrowhead.  Our New Mexico offices are located in Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Santa Fe.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

 

Making Things Easier for Those Left Behind: Leaving a “Map”

By | Attorney Andrea Claus, E-Newsletter Archive, Estate Planning | No Comments

I’ve met with people who’ve been diligent in creating a plan and memorializing their final wishes, yet have not communicated where these documents might be found.  This oversight can be especially worrisome because loved ones don’t often search for documents until after a funeral.  Without documents outlining final disposition, conflicts can arise between family members as to what a parent or loved one would have wanted.  After a funeral, problems can continue if you’ve not left a current list of assets or the location of important documents.  Leaving your loved ones a “map” will help guide them after you’re gone.

A map is a tool used to get from one point to another- a tool used to prevent getting lost.  Leaving directions or guidelines as to your burial or funeral wishes is like leaving a map for your loved ones.  By providing directions to those left behind, you’ve reduced a burden.  There is no wondering whether something is as you’d have wished, no second-guessing, and the chance for conflict is most likely eliminated.

Providing a list of current assets should be another part of your “map.”  The person whom you’ve charged with settling things after you’ve gone will need to know what to collect for distribution.  By leaving a current list of assets, and clearing out all outdated statements, contracts, and policies, you will make that task much easier.  Ensuring that the person you’ve named knows where to access your estate plan and your “map” is of equal importance.

One of the greatest gifts you can give a loved one is the peace of mind that comes with knowing they’re carrying out your true wishes.  Leaving a “map” not only ensures this, it relieves a great burden during a difficult time.  Call for an appointment with a Morris Hall attorney today; we are happy to review your plans with you.

andrea-claus   Contributed by Morris Hall PLLC Phoenix and Prescott Estate Planning Attorney, Andrea L. Claus.

At Morris Hall, PLLC we have focused our legal practice on estate planning for over 45 years.  Along with estate planning, our attorneys help clients and their families with matters of probate, trust administration, wills, power of attorneys, business planning, succession planning, legacy planning, charitable gifting and other important legal aspects.  We also have divisions in financial, real estate and accounting to help you incorporate all of your planning together, ensuring that everything works perfectly for your needs and situation. Our Arizona offices are located in Phoenix, Mesa, Scottsdale, Carefree, Tucson, Oro Valley, Prescott, Sedona, Flagstaff and Arrowhead.  Our New Mexico offices are located in Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Santa Fe.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

 

 

Thanksgiving

By | Attorney Andrea Claus, Attorney David Eastman, Holidays | No Comments

bigstock-Thanksgiving-Card-Graphic-Illu-3893623

On October 3, 1789, President George Washington named Thursday, November 26, 1789 an official holiday of “sincere and humble thanks.” In the midst of the Civil War in 1863, President Abraham Lincoln issued a proclamation in which he declared the fourth Thursday of every November to be a day of Thanksgiving.

“I do therefore invite my fellow citizens in every part of the United States, and also those who are at sea and those who are sojourning in foreign lands, to set apart and observe the last Thursday of November next, as a day of Thanksgiving and Praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the Heavens.” ~ Abraham Lincoln

For many Americans, Thanksgiving is a day devoted to eating, watching football, eating, shopping, and if there’s still room – eating some more. Although traditional meals and activities like football may be the first things people remember about this holiday, Thanksgiving and all its precursors were based on the principle of gratitude. Whether it was being grateful for a harvest or for the end of a war, or for the relief of a city under siege or for freedom, the underlying purpose was an expression of thankfulness.

As we celebrate this Thanksgiving, let us express gratitude for the family and friends we hold most dear. Let us take a step back from the festivities and food, and reflect upon our freedoms and the sacrifices made to secure that freedom. Let us be grateful for the bounties of life that we enjoy and endeavor to impart some of our substance to those less fortunate.  Simply put – let us all be thankful!

Happy Thanksgiving from Morris Hall, PLLC.

Death & Taxes: Plan for Both

By | Attorney Andrea Claus, Beneficiaries, Death Probate, Estate Planning, Estate taxes, Taxes | No Comments

Most folks don’t look forward to planning for two of life’s guarantees: death and taxes.  However mundane or morbid you view this task, there is planning to be done no matter what your station in life. When properly planned the harshness of both death and taxes can be mitigated.

Through my experience as an estate planning attorney, I have outlined five basic areas that you need to consider when implementing your plan:

  1. Select an estate administrator: The administrator is the person who is in charge when you pass. This should be a responsible person with the time and acumen to carry out your wishes.
  2. Select your beneficiaries: These are the people and/or charities that will get your stuff upon your death. If you do not designate beneficiaries via a trust, will, TOD designation, or other method, the state will dictate who gets the stuff from your estate.  Whatever planning tool you use should be accessible by your estate administrator.  Used properly, that the right tool can minimize taxes and provide asset protection to your beneficiaries; it is a good idea to discuss your strategy with an estate planning attorney.
  3. Asset inventory: This is a list of all the stuff you own (like bank accounts, life insurance policies, real estate . . .). When you die, your estate administrator will need to know what you have and who to contact to collect and distribute.  Creating a list of physical and non-physical items that you own will ensure that no asset is left uncollected.  This inventory should be accessible by your estate administrator upon your death.
  4. Asset review: After the inventory is complete, the beneficiary designations and/or titling of all accounts or policies should be reviewed to ensure that they are in line with your wishes. This is also a good time to consolidate assets for ease of management, if you’re able.  Bringing the account statements, deeds and policies to your estate planning attorney will help you align your wishes with how the titling and beneficiaries read.
  5. Create a debt list: Much like the assets inventory, you should make a list of your debts. If the administrator knows what debts will need to be settled upon your death, distribution of your estate can be accomplished more quickly and efficiently.

These five basic considerations can make life easier for your loved ones and for your administrator.  Your asset inventory and debt list are also a good tool to help you get a grip on your current expenses.  Discussing your goals with an estate planning attorney and reviewing your plan is the best way to ensure you’ve addressed all issues unique to your estate.

andrea-claus  Contributed by Morris Hall PLLC Phoenix , Prescott Estate Planning Attorney, Andrea L. Claus.

 

About Morris Hall, PLLC:
At Morris Hall, PLLC we have focused our legal practice on estate planning for over 45 years.  Along with estate planning, our attorneys help clients and their families with matters of probate, trust administration, wills, power of attorneys, business planning, succession planning, legacy planning, charitable gifting and other important legal aspects.  We also have divisions in financial, real estate and accounting to help you incorporate all of your planning together, ensuring that everything works perfectly for your needs and situation. Our Arizona offices are located in Phoenix, Mesa, Scottsdale, Carefree, Tucson, Oro Valley, Prescott, Sedona, Flagstaff and Arrowhead.  Our New Mexico offices are located in Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Santa Fe.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation

What Happens if I Die Without an Estate Plan?

By | Attorney Andrea Claus, Business Planning, Estate Planning | No Comments

When a person dies, their assets must be distributed. If a person fails to create a will or trust, their property will pass via the state laws of intestate succession. Every state has a specific set of laws providing a sort of default will.  For example, if a person dies without an estate plan in Arizona, the probate court will first determine whether the decedent was married.   Arizona is a community property state, so there are two kinds of property a married decedent passes when they die: their separate property and a one-half interest in the couple’s community property.  Below is a “nutshell” version of where a person’s property goes when they die with no estate plan:

  • If the decedent was married and had no surviving descendants all of the decedent’s property passes to the surviving spouse.
  • If the decedent was married and had surviving descendants who are all descendants of the surviving spouse, all of the decedent’s property passes to the surviving spouse.
  • If the decedent was married and had surviving descendants, one or more of whom are not descendants of the surviving spouse, one half of the decedent’s separate property will pass to the surviving spouse and one half of the separate property and decedent’s entire one half interest in the community property passes to the decedent’s descendants.
  • If the decedent was not married, or if the decedent’s spouse predeceased him or her, the property will go to the decedent’s descendants. Under the statutes, property is distributed per capita at each generation level.  This means that the shares of the decedent’s property to be passed are determined by the number of descendants at each generational level.
  • If the decedent was not married and didn’t have any descendants, then his or her property goes to surviving parents. If both of parents are surviving, then each parent takes equally. If only one parent is surviving then all property goes to the surviving parent. If no parents are surviving, property passes to the decedent’s parents’ descendants per capita at each generation.
  • If a decedent has no surviving descendant, parent, or descendant of a parent, the property will pass to surviving grandparents, if any, or the grandparents’ descendants. If no one is qualified to claim the property under any of the scenarios listed, the property will pass to the State of Arizona.

This “nutshell” version of the Arizona laws of intestate succession is a very brief overview and does not address the many complexities present in blended and non-traditional families.  The outcome in many cases is not consistent with what the decedent would have wanted.  Creating a proper estate plan ensures that  property passes to whom you want, how you want.  Take the first step- contact a Morris Hall attorney today.

andrea-claus  Contributed by Morris Hall, PLLC Phoenix and Prescott Estate Planning Attorney, Andrea L. Claus.

Why Choose Morris Hall, PLLC:
You have a number of options when it comes to estate planning, so why pick Morris Hall?  First off, estate planning and asset protection are a very complicated endeavor and you should only trust someone who focuses exclusively on those matters.  Also, Morris Hall is a proud member of The American Academy of Estate Planning Attorneys (AAEPA) which provides us additional support, advanced training, tools and information that is not available to others – which means that we can better protect your assets and your loved ones.  We are one of only three firms in Arizona that belong to the AAEPA and are the only firm in New Mexico that has been granted membership.  If you have assets and loved ones that you want to protect, you are in good hands with Morris Hall.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

Same-Sex Couples May Find Estate Plan Update Useful

By | Attorney Andrea Claus, Estate Planning, Estate taxes, LGBTQ | No Comments

The Supreme Court’s recent decision in Obergefell v. Hodges, means that state bans on same-sex marriage are unconstitutional.   It also means that same-sex couples might want to update their estate, financial, tax, and retirement plans.

The recent decision will make it easier for same-sex couples to file their taxes jointly.  In community property states, like Arizona and New Mexico, same-sex couples are now able receive the tax advantages associated with holding title as community property: this property is generally entitled to a fully stepped-up basis in the hands of a surviving spouse.  Surviving spouses in same-sex marriages will now also be able to receive IRA funds as a direct rollover.  Same-sex couples will also receive equal access to social security benefits and be able to transfer wealth to each other as spouses.

This historic decision will have a major impact on how same-sex couples plan their estates and their finances moving forward.  The IRS, Social Security Administration, and Labor Department are expected to provide guidance as to the ramifications of the new ruling.  If you are in a same-sex marriage, it is a good idea to sit down with an estate planning attorney to discuss the impact of the recent changes.

andrea-claus Contributed by Phoenix and Prescott Estate Planning Attorney, Andrea L. Claus.

Why Choose Morris Hall, PLLC:
You have a number of options when it comes to estate planning, so why pick Morris Hall?  First off, estate planning and asset protection are a very complicated endeavor and you should only trust someone who focuses exclusively on those matters.  Also, Morris Hall is a proud member of The American Academy of Estate Planning Attorneys (AAEPA) which provides us additional support, advanced training, tools and information that is not available to others – which means that we can better protect your assets and your loved ones.  We are one of only three firms in Arizona that belong to the AAEPA and are the only firm in New Mexico that has been granted membership.  If you have assets and loved ones that you want to protect, you are in good hands with Morris Hall.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

 

 

What Happens if I Die Without an Estate Plan?

By | Attorney Andrea Claus, Death Probate, Trust Administration | No Comments

When a person dies, their assets must be distributed. If a person fails to create a will or trust, their property will pass via the state laws of intestate succession. Every state has a specific set of laws providing a sort of default will.  For example, if a person dies without an estate plan in Arizona, the probate court will first determine whether the decedent was married.   Arizona is a community property state, so there are two kinds of property a married decedent passes when they die: their separate property and a one-half interest in the couple’s community property.  Below is a “nutshell” version of where a person’s property goes when they die with no estate plan:

  • If the decedent was married and had no surviving descendants all of the decedent’s property passes to the surviving spouse.
  • If the decedent was married and had surviving descendants who are all descendants of the surviving spouse, all of the decedent’s property passes to the surviving spouse.
  • If the decedent was married and had surviving descendants, one or more of whom are not descendants of the surviving spouse, one half of the decedent’s separate property will pass to the surviving spouse and one half of the separate property and decedent’s entire one half interest in the community property passes to the decedent’s descendants.
  • If the decedent was not married, or if the decedent’s spouse predeceased him or her, the property will go to the decedent’s descendants. Under the statutes, property is distributed per capita at each generation level.  This means that the shares of the decedent’s property to be passed are determined by the number of descendants at each generational level.
  • If the decedent was not married and didn’t have any descendants, then his or her property goes to surviving parents. If both of parents are surviving, then each parent takes equally. If only one parent is surviving then all property goes to the surviving parent. If no parents are surviving, property passes to the decedent’s parents’ descendants per capita at each generation.
  • If a decedent has no surviving descendant, parent, or descendant of a parent, the property will pass to surviving grandparents, if any, or the grandparents’ descendants. If no one is qualified to claim the property under any of the scenarios listed, the property will pass to the State of Arizona.

This “nutshell” version of the Arizona laws of intestate succession is a very brief overview and does not address the many complexities present in blended and non-traditional families.  The outcome in many cases is not consistent with what the decedent would have wanted.  Creating a proper estate plan ensures that  property passes to whom you want, how you want.  Take the first step- contact a Morris Hall attorney today.

andrea-claus  Contributed by Morris Hall, PLLC Phoenix and Prescott Estate Planning Attorney, Andrea L. Claus.

About Morris Hall, PLLC:
At Morris Hall, PLLC we have focused our legal practice on estate planning for over 45 years.  Along with estate planning, our attorneys help clients and their families with matters of probate, trust administration, wills, power of attorneys, business planning, succession planning, legacy planning, charitable gifting and other important legal aspects.  We also have divisions in financial, real estate and accounting to help you incorporate all of your planning together, ensuring that everything works perfectly for your needs and situation. Our Arizona offices are located in Phoenix, Mesa, Scottsdale, Carefree, Tucson, Oro Valley, Prescott, Sedona, Flagstaff and Arrowhead.  Our New Mexico offices are located in Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Santa Fe.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

Estate Planning Tool: the Grantor Retained Annuity Trust

By | Attorney Andrea Claus, Estate Planning, Other | No Comments

A Grantor Retained Annuity Trust (GRAT) is an irrevocable trust into which the grantor (creator of the trust) transfers assets and retains the right to receive payment of a fixed dollar amount through an annuity for a specified term of years (GRAT term). At the end of the GRAT term, the GRAT’s remaining assets pass, tax free, to designated beneficiaries.

The IRS assumes that a GRAT will grow at a rate (the “7520 rate”) set at the time the trust is established. The IRS does not look at the actual growth of the assets; therefore growth surpassing the assumed rate can be passed on to trust beneficiaries gift and estate tax free. The 7520 rate is important to determining the potential amount that may be passed tax free to beneficiaries on the termination of the trust. The lower the rate, the larger the potential tax free gift. With interest rates at historic lows, the GRAT can be a great wealth transfer tool in certain circumstances.

There is a good deal of analysis that goes in to structuring the GRAT term.  Life expectancy, health conditions, the current 7520 rate, and the size an estate are all considerations impacting the structure of the trust. To discuss whether this is a tool that should be incorporated into your estate plan, contact our office to meet with an attorney.

andrea-claus  Contributed by Morris Hall, PLLC Phoenix and Prescott Estate Planning Attorney, Andrea L. Claus.

What the Attorneys of Morris Hall, PLLC Can Do For You:
The attorneys at Morris Hall have 100’s of years of combined experience ensuring that families’ assets are protected from probate, unnecessary taxes, creditors, ex-spouses and Medicaid spend-down.  Our Arizona offices are located in Phoenix, Mesa, Scottsdale, Carefree, Tucson, Oro Valley, Prescott, Flagstaff and Arrowhead.  Our New Mexico offices are located in Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Santa Fe.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

 

 

Planning for Incapacity

By | Attorney Andrea Claus, Elder Law, Estate Planning, Guardianship | No Comments

The thought of incapacity is unpleasant, thus many people fail to plan for the consequences of incapacitation.  Incapacity can be the result of Alzheimer’s disease or dementia, but it can also happen suddenly due to a stroke or an accident.  The issues that surround incapacity are not limited to medical decisions; there is a financial component as well.

If you are unable to manage your assets and do not have documents addressing incapacity, your family may have to seek a conservatorship from the probate court.  A conservatorship is a probate proceeding that appoints someone (a conservator) to control an incapacitated person’s property if they have no power of attorney.  The court will order a conservatorship under  two general circumstances: 1) if a person is unable to manage his estate and affairs effectively for reasons related to physical or mental incapacity; or 2) the person has property that will be wasted or an estate that will be dissipated unless proper management is put in place.

If the incapacitated person doesn’t have planning documents in place, and a dispute arises within the family, the court might appoint a non-family member to manage the incapacitated person’s assets.  Creating a power of attorney and putting a living trust in place can address these issues and avoid court involvement.  To discuss these or other estate planning issues, contact one of the attorneys at Morris Hall for a free consultation.

andrea-claus  Contributed by Morris Hall, PLLC  Phoenix and Prescott Estate Planning Attorney, Andrea L. Claus.

About Morris Hall, PLLC:
At Morris Hall, PLLC we have focused our legal practice on estate planning for over 45 years.  Along with estate planning, our attorneys help clients and their families with matters of probate, trust administration, wills, power of attorneys, business planning, succession planning, legacy planning, charitable gifting and other important legal aspects.  We also have divisions in financial, real estate and accounting to help you incorporate all of your planning together, ensuring that everything works perfectly for your needs and situation. Our Arizona offices are located in Phoenix, Mesa, Scottsdale, Carefree, Tucson, Oro Valley, Prescott, Sedona, Flagstaff and Arrowhead.  Our New Mexico offices are located in Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Santa Fe.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.