5 Most Common Estate Planning Errors

By | Asset Protection, E-Alert, Estate Planning, Healthcare documents, Living Will, Pour Over Will, Will | No Comments

Most families don’t receive their wealth through inheritance or winning the lottery, but rather through years of hard work and sacrifice. However, it always amazes me that although everyone understands that we are all going to die, a vast majority disregard estate planning completely.

Here are five common estate planning mistakes that can ruin the legacy that you have worked so hard to build.

1.  No Will.  Approximately 70% of Americans do not plan at all, and therefore die ‘intestate’. Depending on which state you live in, dying without a Will could unfortunately cause your estate to pass to people that you wouldn’t have chosen.

2.  Failing to update your estate plan.  Too often, people that have an estate plan allow their plan to collect dust on a shelf. The plan is forgotten. Life changes such as divorce, deaths and births can have a significant impact on one’s original choices. For example, when you create a Will and leave everything to your spouse, you don’t anticipate a future divorce where your hard earned funds could go to the ex-spouse’s new family. Depending on the state, this could happen. An estate plan should be reviewed every 2 years to ensure that your choices are up to date with life’s changes.

3.  Unrealistic view regarding beneficiaries.  Every person should ask themselves if their chosen beneficiaries will be mature enough emotionally and financially to handle a pot of cash. Are they a spendthrift? Do they have a drug problem or gambling issues? If there is any doubt now, your estate plan can take these issues into account and protect your beneficiaries from themselves.

4.  Inadequate estate plan.  Some families begin estate planning with a simple Will; however, as years go on and assets are accumulated, the Will may not be the strongest tool. A properly drafted Revocable Living Trust will allow for the avoidance of a living and death probate, restrictions on spendthrift beneficiaries, and asset protection and a minimization of tax issues.

5.  Failure to change Personal Representative and/or Trustee.  Sometimes those we name in fiduciary roles may no longer be the best choice. Our relationships with these folks may change over time, or they may move out of state. Reviewing your plan every 2 years is essential to ensure that your choices are the best they can be.

Wendy-Harn-PhotoContributed by Morris Hall, PLLC Tucson, Oro Valley and Green Valley Estate Planning Attorney and Partner, Wendy W. Harn.

About Morris Hall, PLLC:
At Morris Hall, PLLC we have focused our legal practice on estate planning for over 45 years.  Along with estate planning, our attorneys help clients and their families with matters of probate, trust administration, wills, power of attorneys, business planning, succession planning, legacy planning, charitable gifting and other important legal aspects.  We also have divisions in financial, real estate and accounting to help you incorporate all of your planning together, ensuring that everything works perfectly for your needs and situation. We have offices throughout Arizona and New Mexico.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

palmerfernandez

Tragic loss at All Ages

By | Celebrity Estates, E-Alert | No Comments

This weekend demonstrates that Death treats us all equally.  Death does not care if you are rich or you are poor.  Death reaches out and takes you when it feels it is your time.  As a sports fan, I was impacted by last weekend’s loss of Arnold Palmer and Jose Fernandez.

At 87 years young, Arnold Palmer, one of golf’s legendary figures, passed Sunday evening waiting for cardiac surgery.  Though he was approaching his 9th decade, his passing was still a shock.  He was the epitome of sportsmanship, and can always be seen at the golf course.  Greatness could not save Arnie.

Contrast that with the loss of Jose Fernandez at the age of 24.  Forgive me, but a 24 year old shouldn’t die.  It is not right.  But Death cares not.  Age is not a hurdle that Death has to clear.  The news shocked his home country of Cuba – he was more than a ball player, he embodied freedom.

With Arnie, we can celebrate a life lived.  We can celebrate the accomplishments and accolades.  We can revel in all that he gave to golf and the rest of us.

With Jose, it is pure loss.  It is the loss of opportunity.  The loss of his joy.  The loss of his future.  And our loss to be able to watch his accomplishments amass.

We have always said everyone needs an estate plan – what that plan entails varies with age, wealth and goals.  And this weekend’s sports losses is a striking example as why this is so.

Make sure you have a plan, and that it has been reviewed to ensure it does what you need it to.  See one of our estate planning attorneys today.

west-hunsakerContributed by Morris Hall, PLLC Carefree and Phoenix Estate Planning Attorney and Partner, West Hunsaker.

About Morris Hall, PLLC:
At Morris Hall, PLLC we have focused our legal practice on estate planning for over 45 years.  Along with estate planning, our attorneys help clients and their families with matters of probate, trust administration, wills, power of attorneys, business planning, succession planning, legacy planning, charitable gifting and other important legal aspects.  We also have divisions in financial, real estate and accounting to help you incorporate all of your planning together, ensuring that everything works perfectly for your needs and situation. Our Arizona offices are located in Phoenix, Mesa, Scottsdale, Carefree, Tucson, Oro Valley, Green Valley, Prescott, Sedona, Flagstaff and Arrowhead.  Our New Mexico offices are located in Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Santa Fe.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

Asset Protection – It Works

By | Asset Protection, Bankruptcy, Estate Planning, Estate taxes, Trust Administration | No Comments

If I told you an inheritance can be left to whomever you want, without the fear that it could be taken by a lawsuit, bankruptcy or even divorce, would you want that benefit included in your plan? In today’s litigious society, asset protection is a critical component in anyone’s estate plan.

Our clients make sure the inheritance they leave their loved ones is protected. With a properly drafted trust, you can rest in peace knowing that the money you left behind will be used by your loved one, and not unintended people who could possibly take it from them.

We recently won a case for the son of a client because our client had the right language in his trust. I first met our client several years ago to review and update his estate plan. He did not think, at that time, that any of his children were going to be in any financial trouble. After our conversation, he made clear that the assets (his home and some savings) were to go to his children, and not to any future creditor (either a plaintiff in a lawsuit or bankruptcy trustee) because we discussed that risk and the need for assets protection. These were not current issues, but proper planning is using foresight to plan for life’s uncertainty.

Unfortunately, we had to utilize his plan a little sooner than we had hoped. Our client passed last year. After we were hired to assist with the administration of the trust we learned that one of our deceased client's sons was going through a bankruptcy. The trust we drafted was going to be put to the test.

We were asked by the son's bankruptcy counsel in another state to appear in the bankruptcy proceeding and defend the language in the trust document we had drafted for the bankruptcy debtor's father. We prepared our oral arguments and drafted a brief explaining to the judge how the trust works, and that the bankruptcy trustee was not entitled to any of the inheritance. The judge ultimately agreed. Every single penny of the inheritance was protected from the bankruptcy because of language we included in our trust document. And once the bankruptcy is settled, our client’s son will be able to use the inheritance to rebuild his financial life; because it is available to him, just as his dad intended.

And asset protection is not only for the rich. We frequently hear clients refer to their estates as "modest," but as the case we just went through tells us, even a modest inheritance of $50,000 can be worth protecting. Especially when you consider your heirs potentially losing the inheritance you leave them to an unintended third-party, it might seems more valuable, and perhaps worth more effort to protect. But to have this kind of asset protection in place, you have to plan ahead of time.

Come and talk with one of our estate planning attorneys and see how we can make asset protection a cornerstone to your plan.

james-plitz

 

 

 

Contributed by Morris Hall Attorney and Partner James P. Plitz

 

What the Attorneys of Morris Hall, PLLC Can Do For You:
The attorneys at Morris Hall have 100’s of years of combined experience ensuring that families’ assets are protected from probate, unnecessary taxes, creditors, ex-spouses and Medicaid spend-down. Our New Mexico offices are located in Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Santa Fe. Our Arizona offices are located in Phoenix, Mesa, Scottsdale, Carefree, Tucson, Oro Valley, Green Valley, Prescott, Sedona, Flagstaff and Arrowhead. Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only. It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice. If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

road-trip-1044982_960_720

Traveling – Plan for Your Destination!

By | Healthcare documents | No Comments

Summer time is synonymous with bark yard BBQ’s, pool time, ice cream, fireworks and vacations.  Every couple of years our family takes a road trip.  We plan in advance of where we want to go, the routes we will take and the activities along the way.  Although we are adventuresome, it would be unusual for us to steer off of our pre-planned path.

But many people do and prefer to take a different road that leads them to their destination.  Perhaps this will take them to a new town, favorite restaurant or meet new people. While this off the beaten path attitude is great for a road trip, it is not the best advice when preparing for your Health Care documents.

It is not a matter of if, but when.  Unfortunately I don’t have a calendar that will tell me when something might occur where I could not speak for myself or make any decisions.  At this time, pre-planning is imperative.   Having things in place before I get to that point allows me to make the choices that best suit the road that I want to take.

I have met a number of individuals who think that such documents do not apply to them – they are too young, their family knows what they want or that it is just too hard to think about.  Life can include hard choices and unpleasant decisions, but pre-planning those allows my family to not bear that burden or feel uncertain of what my wishes truly are.

Leave a road map for your loved ones, pre-plan the route for them and have the documents created.  Call Morris Hall before you take to the road.  This small task gives everyone a clear picture of what your destination includes.

What the Attorneys of Morris Hall, PLLC Can Do For You:
The attorneys at Morris Hall have 100’s of years of combined experience ensuring that families’ assets are protected from probate, unnecessary taxes, creditors, ex-spouses and Medicaid spend-down.  Our Arizona offices are located in Phoenix, Mesa, Scottsdale, Carefree, Tucson, Oro Valley, Green Valley, Prescott, Sedona, Flagstaff and Arrowhead.  Our New Mexico offices are located in Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Santa Fe.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

Happy 100th Birthday to the Federal Estate Tax

By | Estate taxes | No Comments

Yes, the Federal Estate Tax has turned 100. In 1916, the members of congress voted in the Revenue Act of 1916.  This introduced the modern-day income tax and also included what is known today as the Federal Estate Tax.  For 2016, that tax carries an exemption of $5,450,000 per individual.  Over the years, there have been many changes to the U.S. estate tax and in fact, many candidates for Congress and the President of the United Sates have actually asked for a complete repeal of the estate tax.

Andrew Mellon, who was at one time Treasury Secretary, believed that the estate tax would hurt our economy and was a strong advocate for complete repeal of the estate tax. With the higher exemption, fewer Americans now find themselves subject to the estate tax upon their demise.  However those who are fortunate to have an estate in excess of the exemption are still asking that the tax be repealed or at least lowered as they feel it is not a justified revenue source.  Congress has not been keen on the complete repeal of the tax but it appears that this years presidential candidates favor lowering the exemption.  Decisions of this magnitude will mostly not be known until the elections are over and our new president is in office.

 

ron-wilsonContributed by Morris Hall PLLC Phoenix Estate Planning Attorney and Partner, Ronald G. Wilson.

About Morris Hall, PLLC:
At Morris Hall, PLLC we have focused our legal practice on estate planning for over 45 years.  Along with estate planning, our attorneys help clients and their families with matters of probate, trust administration, wills, power of attorneys, business planning, succession planning, legacy planning, charitable gifting and other important legal aspects.  We also have divisions in financial, real estate and accounting to help you incorporate all of your planning together, ensuring that everything works perfectly for your needs and situation. Our Arizona offices are located in Phoenix, Mesa, Scottsdale, Carefree, Tucson, Oro Valley, Green Valley, Prescott, Sedona, Flagstaff and Arrowhead.  Our New Mexico offices are located in Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Santa Fe.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

 

Could You Become Too Affluent for Social Security?

By | Financial Planning, Other, Retirement Planning | 6 Comments

Social Security has been in our country since 1935, and for some, a resource that has been counted upon at retirement.  Currently there is consideration being given to reducing the amount of Social Security that is paid out.  Congress is evaluating the use of a means test to do so.   No one knows if means testing will become a reality, but the discussions that are taking place warrant further exploration and understanding.

A means test is simply a process of looking at income, and based on certain criteria, determines if social security is needed.  For example, one plan being considered would reduce Social Security by $1,000 per month, for every $1,000 of income that is non-Social Security income received over $55,000.

The idea of the means test was originally based upon some language found in the 2015 US budget proposal. The proposal was aimed toward reducing the aggressive Social Security claims, occurring when some are claiming benefits.

A means test could have the greatest impact on those in the middle class.  Hardworking individuals, professionals, and small business owners could be hurt significantly by this proposed evaluation.

The facts are, we do not know if and when means testing will actually be enacted.  The best solution however, is to plan now.   Start saving and protecting your investments for the future.  Morris Hall can help with that process.  We're happy to discuss this with you and advise as to the best processes and procedures and a way to hold your investments, as well as how to invest them.
dan-morris Contributed by Morris Hall PLLC Phoenix Estate Planning Attorney and Senior Partner Dan R. Morris.

What Morris Hall, PLLC can do for you:
The attorneys at Morris Hall have hundreds of years of combined experience, ensuring that families’ assets are protected from probate, unnecessary taxes, creditors, ex-spouses and Medicaid spend-down.  Our Arizona offices are located in Phoenix, Mesa, Scottsdale, Carefree, Tucson, Oro Valley, Green Valley, Prescott, Sedona, Flagstaff and Arrowhead.
Our New Mexico offices are located in Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Santa Fe.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

Dentist tools

A Trip to the Dentist and My Estate Plan

By | Estate Planning, Healthcare documents, Other | No Comments

Every 6 months, it is recommend that you visit your dentist. I have done this for as long as I can remember, and have taught my kids to do the same. I have never enjoyed going, but understand the importance of it and going regularly. Having them cleaned, checked out, and x-rayed from time to time, helps to catch any issues that might be cropping up. It is always a good day to walk out of the office with a high five from my dentist and no cavities.
So, why would I think about my estate plan while at the dentist? How could they possibly be related?
There are more similarities than the average person may think. I realized a few years ago that an estate plan was not about how much money you might have, or your age in life. But more so about planning and taking care of the important things in my life. Just like I take care of my teeth, I want to take care of my family in the event that I am unable to.
So, I set up a plan. It details out all of the things that I want to have happen in the event I am unable to make decisions or I am no longer around. Whew. Got that off of my plate. But the second miss-conception is that once I have a plan done, there is no other work needed. I found out quickly that this is not the case.
Just like the visit to the dentist every 6 months, my estate plan also needs to be reviewed. While it is not always fun to talk about my own death or what might happen, being in control of the decisions that need to be made in that event, gives me the peace of mind I need. Who knows better than myself? Also, things change. Since plan was first created, my children have grown, I might have moved, or have accumulated a new retirement plan – my wishes might change. So, every couple of years, I visit with my estate planning attorney and my plan gets a “checkup”.
Getting a regular review follows the same path as taking care of my teeth, but less painful than having a having a new filling because I didn’t brush properly.

 

About Morris Hall, PLLC:
At Morris Hall, PLLC we have focused our legal practice on estate planning for over 45 years.  Along with estate planning, our attorneys help clients and their families with matters of probate, trust administration, wills, power of attorneys, business planning, succession planning, legacy planning, charitable gifting and other important legal aspects.  We also have divisions in financial, real estate and accounting to help you incorporate all of your planning together, ensuring that everything works perfectly for your needs and situation. Our Arizona offices are located in Phoenix, Mesa, Scottsdale, Carefree, Tucson, Oro Valley, Prescott, Sedona, Flagstaff and Arrowhead.  Our New Mexico offices are located in Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Santa Fe.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

 

Children over 18? Parents Can No Longer Make the Decisions

By | E-Alert, Estate Planning, Living Will, Other, Uncategorized | No Comments

Does a parent have the automatic right to make the decisions for their children over eighteen (18) years of age?

In the past two weeks, I met with two families to assist them in their estate planning options. There was a common theme – each family thought that their children (all over 18) didn’t need their own individual planning because the parents would be able to  be in charge should the need arise.

Let’s take an example to illustrate:  Betty’s eighteen year old son, Sam, was involved in a motorcycle accident which left him unconscious and in a coma.  Can Betty legally make Sam’s healthcare and financial decisions now that he is unable to? No, Betty would legally be unable to do so just because she is Sam’s mother. If Sam had created Healthcare or Financial Powers of Attorney nominating Betty as his primary agent, then Betty would have the appropriate authority. However, the fact that Betty is Sam’s mother doesn’t give her an automatic right to make Sam’s decisions when he is unable to do so.

In our example, if Sam had not created Powers of Attorney, Betty would have to initiate a Guardianship/Conservatorship at the courthouse. This type of proceeding is called a Living Probate, and is very expensive, time consuming and can be humiliating.

And yet another more common example:  Susan and Bill’s eighteen year old daughter, Jill, is about to graduate from high school, and heading off to college in a few months. Will Jill’s parents be able to get access to her medical records should Jill end up at the hospital while away at school? Will they be able to tell the doctor which procedures to do on behalf of Jill? The answers are “No.”

In this common example, Jill is considered an adult, and must designate in writing who can step in and receive her health information or make her health decisions. If she does not do so, and becomes incapacitated, her parents will have to go to court to initiate a Guardianship/Conservatorship.

We can avoid this unnecessary cost and humiliation during our life. How? If you are over eighteen years of age, you need a properly drafted Healthcare Power of Attorney, Mental Healthcare Power of Attorney, Living Will, and Authorization to Disclose Health Information (HIPAA) which nominates an individual(s) chosen by you, not the court, to get access to and handle your medical decisions should you become incapacitated.

 

Wendy-Harn-Photo  Contributed by Morris Hall, PLLC Tucson, Oro Valley and Green Valley Estate Planning Attorney and Partner, Wendy W. Harn.

About Morris Hall, PLLC:
At Morris Hall, PLLC we have focused our legal practice on estate planning for over 45 years.  Along with estate planning, our attorneys help clients and their families with matters of probate, trust administration, wills, power of attorneys, business planning, succession planning, legacy planning, charitable gifting and other important legal aspects.  We also have divisions in financial, real estate and accounting to help you incorporate all of your planning together, ensuring that everything works perfectly for your needs and situation. Our Arizona offices are located in Phoenix, Mesa, Scottsdale, Carefree, Tucson, Oro Valley, Prescott, Sedona, Flagstaff and Arrowhead.  Our New Mexico offices are located in Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Santa Fe.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

 

This is what it sounds like When Doves Cry

By | Celebrity Estates, Estate Planning | No Comments

Purple rain, purple rain is falling upon the millions of fans who grieve over the death of rock and pop legend, Prince.  Prince, also known as Prince Rogers Nelson, passed last week at his Paisley Park home.

Now what happens to his estate?  When you are rich and famous, the popular misconception is that you have your Diamonds and Pearls and your Little Red Corvette planned for.  But there must have been a Breakdown, because Prince’s sister filed to open a probate in Prince’s home county in Minnesota.

In the court documents, Prince’s sister, Tyka Nelson, claims that Prince did not even have a will.  But Let’s [Not] Go Crazy because even if Prince had a will, a probate would still need to be opened.  A will simply tells the court your wishes as to who you would like to be in charge and who will receive your “stuff.”

To avoid the publicity of a court case (and that is what probate is), as well as the cost and potential Controversy, Prince, as well as anyone, should have planned with a revocable trust.  U Know this could be any of us.  We all put off planning, as we live for the Days of Wild; death and incapacity and those drab topics makes us feel like we have a Dirty Mind.

We all want to party like its 1999, and Prince, evidently, was a Partyman.  But unlike a good wine, putting off talking with a qualified attorney about your plans does not get Better with TimeBreakfast Can Wait, but your estate planning should not.

In addition to Tyka, Prince also has five half siblings.  With no planning done, it does not matter if Prince had a Darling Nikki, or Another Love, the state of Minnesota makes all distribution decisions through their laws of intestacy.  You don’t need an Act of God to see that the State’s plan may not be what you need or want.

For You, one of our estate planning attorneys will sit down with you, at a complimentary consultation, and see what plan works best for your situation.  So put on your Rasberry Beret, and use Prince’s lesson as a Sign O’ the Times, and make your appointment today.

jim-plitz  Contributed by Morris Hall, PLLC Albuquerque, Santa Fe and Las Cruces Estate Planning Attorney and Partner, James P. Plitz.

About Morris Hall, PLLC:
At Morris Hall, PLLC we have focused our legal practice on estate planning for over 45 years.  Along with estate planning, our attorneys help clients and their families with matters of probate, trust administration, wills, power of attorneys, business planning, succession planning, legacy planning, charitable gifting and other important legal aspects.  We also have divisions in financial, real estate and accounting to help you incorporate all of your planning together, ensuring that everything works perfectly for your needs and situation. Our Arizona offices are located in Phoenix, Mesa, Scottsdale, Carefree, Tucson, Oro Valley, Prescott, Sedona, Flagstaff and Arrowhead.  Our New Mexico offices are located in Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Santa Fe.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

Make Things Easier for Those Left Behind: Leave a “Map”

By | Attorney Andrea Claus, Beneficiaries, Estate Planning | No Comments

The hardest part in creating your estate plan is seeing the attorney to make sure it is done right.  I want to give the proper kudos to all those I’ve met, those who’ve been diligent in creating a plan and memorializing their final wishes.  Yet many have not listened to my recommended “follow-up” step – communicate with your loved ones.  The most critical piece that needs to be shared is these documents might be found.  This little oversight can be especially worrisome because loved ones don’t often search for estate documents until after the funeral.    At the very least,  leave your loved ones a “map” to help guide them after you’re gone. Without the documents, conflicts can arise between family members as to what a parent or loved one would have wanted.  Further, problems, such as delay and missteps, can continue if you did not leave a current list of assets or the location of important documents.

A map is a tool used to get from one point to another – a tool used to prevent getting lost.  Your map leaves directions or guidelines as to your burial or funeral wishes for your loved ones to follow.  By providing directions to those left behind, you’ve reduced the burden on them to have to decide.  There is no wondering whether something is as you’d have wished, no second-guessing, and the chance for conflict amongst the family is most likely eliminated.

Your map should also provide a list of current assets.  The person whom you’ve charged with settling things after you’ve gone (your ‘executor’) will need to know what you have in order to account for and make your distributions.  By leaving a current list of assets, and clearing out all outdated statements, contracts and policies, you will make that task much easier.  Ensuring that the person you’ve named knows where to access your estate plan and your “map” is of utmost importance.

One of the greatest gifts you can give a loved one is the peace of mind that comes with knowing they’re carrying out your true wishes.  Creating a complete estate plan ensures this, and to leave a “map” will relieve a great burden during a difficult time.  Call for an appointment with a Morris Hall attorney today; we are happy to review your plans and help you outline what all should be in your map.

andrea-claus Contributed by Morris Hall PLLC Phoenix and Prescott Estate Planning Attorney, Andrea L. Claus.

What the Attorneys of Morris Hall, PLLC Can Do For You:
The attorneys at Morris Hall have 100’s of years of combined experience ensuring that families’ assets are protected from probate, unnecessary taxes, creditors, ex-spouses and Medicaid spend-down.  Our Arizona offices are located in Phoenix, Mesa, Scottsdale, Carefree, Tucson, Oro Valley, Prescott, Flagstaff and Arrowhead.  Our New Mexico offices are located in Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Santa Fe.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.