Assets Archives - Morris Hall, PLLC

Same-Sex Couples May Find Estate Plan Update Useful

By | Attorney Andrea Claus, Estate Planning, Estate taxes, LGBT | No Comments

The Supreme Court’s recent decision in Obergefell v. Hodges, means that state bans on same-sex marriage are unconstitutional.   It also means that same-sex couples might want to update their estate, financial, tax, and retirement plans.

The recent decision will make it easier for same-sex couples to file their taxes jointly.  In community property states, like Arizona and New Mexico, same-sex couples are now able receive the tax advantages associated with holding title as community property: this property is generally entitled to a fully stepped-up basis in the hands of a surviving spouse.  Surviving spouses in same-sex marriages will now also be able to receive IRA funds as a direct rollover.  Same-sex couples will also receive equal access to social security benefits and be able to transfer wealth to each other as spouses.

This historic decision will have a major impact on how same-sex couples plan their estates and their finances moving forward.  The IRS, Social Security Administration, and Labor Department are expected to provide guidance as to the ramifications of the new ruling.  If you are in a same-sex marriage, it is a good idea to sit down with an estate planning attorney to discuss the impact of the recent changes.

andrea-claus Contributed by Phoenix and Prescott Estate Planning Attorney, Andrea L. Claus.

Why Choose Morris Hall, PLLC:
You have a number of options when it comes to estate planning, so why pick Morris Hall?  First off, estate planning and asset protection are a very complicated endeavor and you should only trust someone who focuses exclusively on those matters.  Also, Morris Hall is a proud member of The American Academy of Estate Planning Attorneys (AAEPA) which provides us additional support, advanced training, tools and information that is not available to others – which means that we can better protect your assets and your loved ones.  We are one of only three firms in Arizona that belong to the AAEPA and are the only firm in New Mexico that has been granted membership.  If you have assets and loved ones that you want to protect, you are in good hands with Morris Hall.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

 

 

Penny Wise and Pound Foolish; Doing Your Estate Plan on the Cheap:

By | Attorney David Eastman, Estate Planning, Living Will, Other, Preparedness | No Comments

Most of us work very hard to accumulate our nest eggs. Sacrifice of time and energy, is often made to acquire the assets that we have. To ensure that these hard earned assets will be distributed where we want, how we want, and be managed by whom we want, it is critical to have the necessary legal documents in place.

To save a few bucks, people often look to “do-it-yourself” software programs to create their personal estate plans. Be very careful of these shortcuts. As the old adage states: Penny wise, pound foolish. Don’t work your whole life acquiring your nest egg simply to leave it to chance that everything will work out when you are incapacitated or dead.

A 2011 ConsumerReports.org article described that after testing LegalZoom estate planning documents and other software programs similar to LegalZoom, it was determined that “…unless your needs are very simple - say, you want to leave everything to your spouse with no other provisions - none of them are likely to meet your needs.” Consumer Reports found issues throughout the LegalZoom documents and found them unsatisfactory to use in most instances.

Preparing one’s own estate planning documents through an online legal document service can be a risky proposition. Estate planning has many nuances. It often addresses complex and technical points of law, and covers a broad range of issues even if a person does not have substantial assets. As stated in the disclaimer on its website, LegalZoom and its services are not a substitute for the advice of an attorney; it does not apply the law to the facts of a particular situation, and the information on its website is not guaranteed to be correct, complete, or up-to-date.

An experienced estate planning attorney adds significant value to the process to help ensure that a costly mistake, which may not be discovered until a crisis develops, doesn’t occur. A qualified attorney stays current on developments in the law, which helps ensure the plan is current and drafted effectively, and meets the individual’s objectives and needs.

Developing a relationship with a good estate planning attorney allows you to have a trusted advisor who can provide guidance on your most important lifetime decisions and to assist your family when you are gone.

dave-eastmanContributed by Phoenix, Arrowhead and Scottsdale Estate Planning Attorney, David T. Eastman.

What the Attorneys of Morris Hall, PLLC Can Do For You:
The attorneys at Morris Hall have 100’s of years of combined experience ensuring that families’ assets are protected from probate, unnecessary taxes, creditors, ex-spouses and Medicaid spend-down.  Our Arizona offices are located in Phoenix, Mesa, Scottsdale, Carefree, Tucson, Oro Valley, Prescott, Flagstaff and Arrowhead.  Our New Mexico offices are located in Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Santa Fe.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

Why You Need a Living Trust

By | Beneficiaries, Death Probate, Estate Planning, Healthcare documents, Living Will | No Comments

This is the second piece of a four-part series on why you need a living trust.  As mentioned in my previous blog, I recently read an article from a well-known business publication that provided four reasons why you don’t need a living trust.  The second reason provided by the publication is:

~ Probate doesn’t have to be a nightmare ~

The article points out that many states have streamlined processes for small estates.  In addition, the article states that probate can be beneficial because the process is monitored by the court, which helps ensure that the executor is following the provisions of the will.

Although probate can be streamlined, that is only true for a minority of cases. Many states don’t offer a streamlined process, and others consider a “small estate” to be a total estate value of $5,000 to $10,000.  The truth is - probate is most often a nightmare.

Here are a few disadvantages to probate that the article fails to mention:

  • Probate is expensive. Probate can cost up to 4% to 5% of the gross estate. For example, if you have a house worth $400,000, with $200,000 left on the mortgage, the attorney will base the fee on the $400,000, and not consider there is only $200,000 worth of equity in the home.
  • Probate is public record. This means anyone can view your probate file and have access to your personal information.
  • If you live in a state that has a streamlined process (say with a $100,000 probate threshold), but you own a $75,000 asset in a non-streamlined state that has a $50,000 probate threshold, you will be required to open a probate in the non-streamlined state.
  • If your designated beneficiary is a minor, or is declared mentally incapacitated at the time of distribution, a conservatorship will be required to determine who will manage the beneficiary’s inheritance until the beneficiary is no longer a minor or regains capacity. Upon the minor turning an adult, which in many states is 18 years old, the conservator will have to release the money to the child. Having an 18 year old manage even a small amount of wealth could be problematic.
  • The probate process is monitored by the probate court, but it is also influenced by the court’s schedule; meaning, if the court’s calendar is heavily booked, then you may be waiting a long time for the probate to close. Many probates can take up to 18 to 24 months to complete.
  • More often than not, in a probate proceeding, it means that your loved ones will receive their inheritance as an outright distribution. This means their inheritance will not have any protection from future divorces, creditors, bankruptcies, or taxes. Most of us have worked too hard, sacrificed too much, worked endless hours to see our legacy destroyed or wiped out by leaving everything we have to those we love without any protections. With a living trust, not only can you avoid probate, but you can also ensure that your loved one’s inheritance will be protected after you are gone.

The above examples are just a few of the disadvantages of a probate.  A properly drafted revocable living trust can prevent all of the above-listed disadvantages. Before deciding on whether to create a will or a living trust, contact a qualified estate planning attorney who can help assess what estate planning method is right for you.

darren-richardson  Contributed by Morris Hall, PLLC Phoenix Estate Planning Attorney, Darren L. Richardson.

Why Choose Morris Hall, PLLC:
You have a number of options when it comes to estate planning, so why pick Morris Hall?  First off, estate planning and asset protection are a very complicated endeavor and you should only trust someone who focuses exclusively on those matters.  Also, Morris Hall is a proud member of The American Academy of Estate Planning Attorneys (AAEPA) which provides us additional support, advanced training, tools and information that is not available to others – which means that we can better protect your assets and your loved ones.  We are one of only three firms in Arizona that belong to the AAEPA and are the only firm in New Mexico that has been granted membership.  If you have assets and loved ones that you want to protect, you are in good hands with Morris Hall.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

 

 

 

What Happens if I Die Without an Estate Plan?

By | Attorney Andrea Claus, Death Probate, Trust Administration | No Comments

When a person dies, their assets must be distributed. If a person fails to create a will or trust, their property will pass via the state laws of intestate succession. Every state has a specific set of laws providing a sort of default will.  For example, if a person dies without an estate plan in Arizona, the probate court will first determine whether the decedent was married.   Arizona is a community property state, so there are two kinds of property a married decedent passes when they die: their separate property and a one-half interest in the couple’s community property.  Below is a “nutshell” version of where a person’s property goes when they die with no estate plan:

  • If the decedent was married and had no surviving descendants all of the decedent’s property passes to the surviving spouse.
  • If the decedent was married and had surviving descendants who are all descendants of the surviving spouse, all of the decedent’s property passes to the surviving spouse.
  • If the decedent was married and had surviving descendants, one or more of whom are not descendants of the surviving spouse, one half of the decedent’s separate property will pass to the surviving spouse and one half of the separate property and decedent’s entire one half interest in the community property passes to the decedent’s descendants.
  • If the decedent was not married, or if the decedent’s spouse predeceased him or her, the property will go to the decedent’s descendants. Under the statutes, property is distributed per capita at each generation level.  This means that the shares of the decedent’s property to be passed are determined by the number of descendants at each generational level.
  • If the decedent was not married and didn’t have any descendants, then his or her property goes to surviving parents. If both of parents are surviving, then each parent takes equally. If only one parent is surviving then all property goes to the surviving parent. If no parents are surviving, property passes to the decedent’s parents’ descendants per capita at each generation.
  • If a decedent has no surviving descendant, parent, or descendant of a parent, the property will pass to surviving grandparents, if any, or the grandparents’ descendants. If no one is qualified to claim the property under any of the scenarios listed, the property will pass to the State of Arizona.

This “nutshell” version of the Arizona laws of intestate succession is a very brief overview and does not address the many complexities present in blended and non-traditional families.  The outcome in many cases is not consistent with what the decedent would have wanted.  Creating a proper estate plan ensures that  property passes to whom you want, how you want.  Take the first step- contact a Morris Hall attorney today.

andrea-claus  Contributed by Morris Hall, PLLC Phoenix and Prescott Estate Planning Attorney, Andrea L. Claus.

About Morris Hall, PLLC:
At Morris Hall, PLLC we have focused our legal practice on estate planning for over 45 years.  Along with estate planning, our attorneys help clients and their families with matters of probate, trust administration, wills, power of attorneys, business planning, succession planning, legacy planning, charitable gifting and other important legal aspects.  We also have divisions in financial, real estate and accounting to help you incorporate all of your planning together, ensuring that everything works perfectly for your needs and situation. Our Arizona offices are located in Phoenix, Mesa, Scottsdale, Carefree, Tucson, Oro Valley, Prescott, Sedona, Flagstaff and Arrowhead.  Our New Mexico offices are located in Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Santa Fe.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

2015 IRA Contribution Limits

By | Estate Planning, Retirement Planning | No Comments

As the months of 2015 wisp away, now is a good time to think about what you or your loved ones have put away for tomorrow.  Saving for retirement should be a big goal for everyone.  And the earlier you start (or encourage your kids and grandkids to start), the more financially stable your retirement years will be.  I recently read an article that showed how much more a person would have at age 65 if they had contributed $2000 a year starting at 18 and ending at age 24, versus a person who started contributing the same $2000 at age 24, and continued contributing each year until age 65 – it was nearly a $1 million difference (the growth of the investments were presumed to be the same).

I do realize that the 18 year boat has sailed for most of us, but this is good to help urge the younger members of your family.  The IRS does limit how much you can put away for retirement, so you need to understand the limits in doing so.

There are several different thresholds to consider.  This year, the limit to contribute into your IRA or Roth IRA is unchanged at $5,500.  In addition, for those like me who are over age 50, there is a “catch-up” provision that also remains unchanged at $1,000.  For employees who participate in a 401(k), 403(b) and most 457 plans, the contribution limit is increased to $18,000 for 2015. That is good news to those that are able to contribute at the maximum level.   More good news for us older folk, the catch-up contribution for employees aged 50 and over has increased to $6,000.

The IRS also places restrictions on the deductibility of traditional IRA contributions.  2015 introduces some changes to the deductibility. The deduction begins to be phased out for single taxpayers and heads of household who are also covered by a work place retirement plan (e.g. 401(k)), and have a modified adjust gross income (“MAGI”) between $61,000 and $71,000.  If you are married and filing jointly and the spouse who makes the IRA contribution is also covered by a work place retirement plan, the deduction phase-out begins with MAGI $98,000 to $118,000.  For a married individual who files a separate return and who is also covered by a work place retirement plan, the phase-out range remains at the low income levels of $0 and $10,000.

Saving for retirement is important.  And there are important levels to understand based on many variables.  Understanding your contribution limits or restrictions is an important piece you’re your future planning.  The Morris Hall team understands these hurdles, and has put legal, financial and accounting in place to help you make the best choices.

ron-wilson Contributed by Morris Hall, PLLC Phoenix Estate Planning Attorney, Ronald G. Wilson.

About Morris Hall, PLLC:
At Morris Hall, PLLC we have focused our legal practice on estate planning for over 45 years.  Along with estate planning, our attorneys help clients and their families with matters of probate, trust administration, wills, power of attorneys, business planning, succession planning, legacy planning, charitable gifting and other important legal aspects.  We also have divisions in financial, real estate and accounting to help you incorporate all of your planning together, ensuring that everything works perfectly for your needs and situation. Our Arizona offices are located in Phoenix, Mesa, Scottsdale, Carefree, Tucson, Oro Valley, Prescott, Sedona, Flagstaff and Arrowhead.  Our New Mexico offices are located in Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Santa Fe.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

 

Estate Planning Tool: the Grantor Retained Annuity Trust

By | Attorney Andrea Claus, Estate Planning, Other | No Comments

A Grantor Retained Annuity Trust (GRAT) is an irrevocable trust into which the grantor (creator of the trust) transfers assets and retains the right to receive payment of a fixed dollar amount through an annuity for a specified term of years (GRAT term). At the end of the GRAT term, the GRAT’s remaining assets pass, tax free, to designated beneficiaries.

The IRS assumes that a GRAT will grow at a rate (the “7520 rate”) set at the time the trust is established. The IRS does not look at the actual growth of the assets; therefore growth surpassing the assumed rate can be passed on to trust beneficiaries gift and estate tax free. The 7520 rate is important to determining the potential amount that may be passed tax free to beneficiaries on the termination of the trust. The lower the rate, the larger the potential tax free gift. With interest rates at historic lows, the GRAT can be a great wealth transfer tool in certain circumstances.

There is a good deal of analysis that goes in to structuring the GRAT term.  Life expectancy, health conditions, the current 7520 rate, and the size an estate are all considerations impacting the structure of the trust. To discuss whether this is a tool that should be incorporated into your estate plan, contact our office to meet with an attorney.

andrea-claus  Contributed by Morris Hall, PLLC Phoenix and Prescott Estate Planning Attorney, Andrea L. Claus.

What the Attorneys of Morris Hall, PLLC Can Do For You:
The attorneys at Morris Hall have 100’s of years of combined experience ensuring that families’ assets are protected from probate, unnecessary taxes, creditors, ex-spouses and Medicaid spend-down.  Our Arizona offices are located in Phoenix, Mesa, Scottsdale, Carefree, Tucson, Oro Valley, Prescott, Flagstaff and Arrowhead.  Our New Mexico offices are located in Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Santa Fe.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

 

 

Fraudulent Tax Returns Filed Under Your Name

By | E-Alert, Estate taxes | No Comments

I recently received an official letter from a state that I have never lived  nor preformed business in.  This letter was from the state’s tax department informing me they needed more information before they could respond to my request for a tax refund.  The next day I received another letter from a second state.  Then one from the IRS.  I learned from the second state that this request had been done using my wife and my names in six states. The good news is the states taking measures to catch these false claims simply by asking for more information.

 

In my case, the individuals were not trying to receive a tax refund since no taxes had been paid.  They were trying to get benefits from each state. It is not known what specific benefits, but trying to collect whatever benefits they can from each state.

This is very troubling and of significant concern.  What is happening?  What is at risk?  I contacted our banker and accountant to discover  that this is not an unusual event any more.  This article by Money Magazine, http://time.com/money/3709141/stolen-tax-refund/, gives a great deal of information about what is happening. More importantly,  article provides  very helpful advice on what to do and how to handle the situation.

The article outlines steps that are imperative for situations such as this.  It is a priority to follow the outlined steps to ensure the records in those states are corrected.  Additional steps will be taken to protect us from  impact to our credit as well as possible  tax fraud.

As a side note,  our federal tax return is on an extension. In those other states, a tax return has not been, and will not be filed. You have to stay alert; as you never know how someone is accessing and then using your personal information to defraud you.  In my case, I have no idea how they found our information and do not believe we will ever know.

As our client you are very important.  We will continue to provide you with information that will protect you and your family today and in the future.

dan-morrisContributed by Morris Hall Phoenix Estate Planning Attorney and Senior Partner, Dan R. Morris.

Why Choose Morris Hall, PLLC:
You have a number of options when it comes to estate planning, so why pick Morris Hall?  First off, estate planning and asset protection are a very complicated endeavor and you should only trust someone who focuses exclusively on those matters.  Also, Morris Hall is a proud member of The American Academy of Estate Planning Attorneys (AAEPA) which provides us additional support, advanced training, tools and information that is not available to others – which means that we can better protect your assets and your loved ones.  We are one of only three firms in Arizona that belong to the AAEPA and are the only firm in New Mexico that has been granted membership.  If you have assets and loved ones that you want to protect, you are in good hands with Morris Hall.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

 

Same-Sex Marriage and Estate Planning after US Supreme Court Decision

By | Estate Planning, Historical Events, LGBT | No Comments

In a 5-4 decision by the United States Supreme Court, Justice Kennedy, writing for the majority, stated: “The Constitution promises liberty to all within its reach, a liberty that includes certain specific rights that allow persons, within a lawful realm, to define and express their identity. The Petitioners in these cases seek to find that liberty by marrying someone of the same sex . . . .” Justice Kennedy concludes the opinion by saying: “They ask for equal dignity in the eyes of the law. The Constitution grants them that right.”

Now that same-sex marriage is legal nationwide, every state must respect same-sex marriages performed in any other state.

With this decision, same-sex couples will have the following rights that every other married couple has:

  • They can travel within the United States without concern that their marriage will not be recognized. However, their marriage may not be recognized in other countries.
  • If they choose to divorce, they may do so wherever they are living.
  • They may be able to seek a state income tax refund for past open years.
  • They can file state income tax returns as a married couple.
  • They would get a state level gift/estate/inheritance tax marital deduction for assets gifted or left to their spouse, just like a traditional couple.

Simply because LGBT couples may now legally marry in every state does not mean they will. Thus, it is imperative for unmarried LGBT couples to create an estate plan; otherwise, should one of them die or become incapacitated, the significant other may not receive anything or have any rights.

dave-eastman  Contributed by Morris Hall, PLLC Arrowhead, Scottsdale and Phoenix Estate Planning Attorney and Partner, David T. Eastman.

What the Attorneys of Morris Hall, PLLC Can Do For You:
The attorneys at Morris Hall have 100’s of years of combined experience ensuring that families’ assets are protected from probate, unnecessary taxes, creditors, ex-spouses and Medicaid spend-down.  Our Arizona offices are located in Phoenix, Mesa, Scottsdale, Carefree, Tucson, Oro Valley, Prescott, Flagstaff and Arrowhead.  Our New Mexico offices are located in Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Santa Fe.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

 

 

Planning for Incapacity

By | Attorney Andrea Claus, Elder Law, Estate Planning, Guardianship | No Comments

The thought of incapacity is unpleasant, thus many people fail to plan for the consequences of incapacitation.  Incapacity can be the result of Alzheimer’s disease or dementia, but it can also happen suddenly due to a stroke or an accident.  The issues that surround incapacity are not limited to medical decisions; there is a financial component as well.

If you are unable to manage your assets and do not have documents addressing incapacity, your family may have to seek a conservatorship from the probate court.  A conservatorship is a probate proceeding that appoints someone (a conservator) to control an incapacitated person’s property if they have no power of attorney.  The court will order a conservatorship under  two general circumstances: 1) if a person is unable to manage his estate and affairs effectively for reasons related to physical or mental incapacity; or 2) the person has property that will be wasted or an estate that will be dissipated unless proper management is put in place.

If the incapacitated person doesn’t have planning documents in place, and a dispute arises within the family, the court might appoint a non-family member to manage the incapacitated person’s assets.  Creating a power of attorney and putting a living trust in place can address these issues and avoid court involvement.  To discuss these or other estate planning issues, contact one of the attorneys at Morris Hall for a free consultation.

andrea-claus  Contributed by Morris Hall, PLLC  Phoenix and Prescott Estate Planning Attorney, Andrea L. Claus.

About Morris Hall, PLLC:
At Morris Hall, PLLC we have focused our legal practice on estate planning for over 45 years.  Along with estate planning, our attorneys help clients and their families with matters of probate, trust administration, wills, power of attorneys, business planning, succession planning, legacy planning, charitable gifting and other important legal aspects.  We also have divisions in financial, real estate and accounting to help you incorporate all of your planning together, ensuring that everything works perfectly for your needs and situation. Our Arizona offices are located in Phoenix, Mesa, Scottsdale, Carefree, Tucson, Oro Valley, Prescott, Sedona, Flagstaff and Arrowhead.  Our New Mexico offices are located in Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Santa Fe.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

Top 10 Reasons To Have an Estate Plan

By | Estate Planning, Estate taxes, Other | No Comments

Do we know if we are going to become incapacitated? I think if we are honest, we would say the answer is no. However, do we know if we are going to die? We know the answer is yes. The following are the top 10 reasons why an estate plan is essential.

  1. Someone needs to be in place to take care of your financial and health
    care needs when you can no longer make those decisions for yourself.
  2. Nominate someone to be the guardian of your minor children.
  3. Protection of your assets and decide who will receive them after you pass away.
  4. To provide for children of a prior marriage.
  5. To provide for the needs of a special needs person in your life.
  6. To distribute your estate down your bloodline and out of reach of your children’s spouses/ex-spouses.
  7. To provide your children with asset protection for the share you leave them.
  8. To provide retirement assets to your beneficiaries with a continued “stretch out” of the distribution.
  9. To ensure your family business stays intact with proper management.
  10. Keep your financial and personal matters private, and out of the public eye.

 

We have reviewed thousands of estate plans and what we often find is that personal and law changes are not in the plan which can cause beneficiaries to lose asset protection against their creditors, divorcing ex-spouses and loss of Medicaid spend-down protection.

If you don’t have an estate plan in place, now is the time to start the discussion with one of our experienced estate planning attorneys. If you have an estate plan in place but it’s been more than three years since you have had it reviewed by an attorney, it’s time for a checkup.

Wendy-Harn-PhotoContributed by Morris Hall, PLLC,  Tucson and Oro Valley Estate Planning Attorney and Partner, Wendy W. Harn.

Why Choose Morris Hall, PLLC:
You have a number of options when it comes to estate planning, so why pick Morris Hall?  First off, estate planning and asset protection are a very complicated endeavor and you should only trust someone who focuses exclusively on those matters.  Also, Morris Hall is a proud member of The American Academy of Estate Planning Attorneys (AAEPA) which provides us additional support, advanced training, tools and information that is not available to others – which means that we can better protect your assets and your loved ones.  We are one of only three firms in Arizona that belong to the AAEPA and are the only firm in New Mexico that has been granted membership.  If you have assets and loved ones that you want to protect, you are in good hands with Morris Hall.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

 

 

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