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Considerations in Planning for a Special Needs Beneficiary: Part I

By | Attorney Andrea Claus, Beneficiaries, Special Needs | No Comments

I met with a prospect the other day, a married couple with 3 adult children.  It was a pretty typical meeting until I reviewed their existing distributions: when the second of them passed, there estate was to be left 50-50 to only two of their three kids.  I asked why they are disinheriting their third child, and their reply was so that he would not lose his government benefits.

I hear that kind of story all of the time. Having a special needs loved one has many ups and many downs.  However, it is important to understand some of the basic rules when it comes to planning for families with special people.  There is so much to go through, I will be writing this in three parts, so look for Part II soon.

Each family I meet with is unique; everyone has their individual concerns when it comes to estate planning. Those planning for a special needs loved one must carefully consider many things when crafting their plan.  A crucial piece of planning information is determining if the special needs beneficiary is in receipt of any type of government benefit or assistance program.  There are different categories of assistance that a special needs individual might qualify for:

The first category is the entitlement programs. They are called entitlement programs because a person does not have to have low income or assets to qualify for them; the person is “entitled” to receive the benefit.  The two most common entitlement programs are Social Security Disability Income (“SSDI”), and Medicare.  There are different ways to qualify for SSDI, but typically special needs persons become eligible under the Childhood Disability Benefits or Disabled Adult Child Program. Since SSDI and Medicare eligibility is not based on income or assets, these programs do not usually need to be considered when developing an estate plan for special needs beneficiaries.

The second category is the “means tested” programs.  There are certain programs and benefits for special needs individuals where that individual’s income and assets are considered.  These “means-tested” programs include Supplemental Security Income (“SSI”), Medicaid, In Home Supportive Services, Subsidized or Section 8 Housing, and Temporary Aid to Needy Families.

For an individual receiving these types of benefits, or in need of these types of benefits, careful planning is necessary-an inheritance can disqualify receipt of the benefit.  Without the proper planning an inheritance will need to be “spent down” to the level where he or she once again qualifies. Since these means-tested programs generally do not allow a person to have more than $2,000 in their name, the receipt of an inheritance will disqualify a special needs beneficiary until he or she has spent the inheritance down to $2,000.

What is intended as a heartfelt gift can do significant damage.  An inheritance of greater than $2,000 has the potential to cause the loss of Medicaid for a special needs beneficiary, which can be devastating since he or she may not be eligible for any other kind of health insurance coverage.

It does not have to be that way.  A properly drafted plan can pass an inheritance of any size to a special needs beneficiary without the loss of benefits, even if it is a means-tested program.  If you have a special needs beneficiary, we can put together a plan that will do what you intend it to: benefit your loved one.

andrea-claus  Contributed by Morris Hall, PLLC Phoenix and Prescott Estate Planning Attorney, Andrea L. Claus.

What the Attorneys of Morris Hall, PLLC Can Do For You:
The attorneys at Morris Hall have 100’s of years of combined experience ensuring that families’ assets are protected from probate, unnecessary taxes, creditors, ex-spouses and Medicaid spend-down.  Our Arizona offices are located in Phoenix, Mesa, Scottsdale, Carefree, Tucson, Oro Valley, Prescott, Flagstaff and Arrowhead.  Our New Mexico offices are located in Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Santa Fe.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

 

Let’s Talk About Death

By | Estate Planning, Uncategorized | No Comments

I am fortunate enough to be able to talk to the public about estate planning.  In fact, I have upcoming events on February 17 & 18 in Albuquerque and Rio Rancho.  These are great ways to help break down the walls, the discomfort, when talking about death and dying.

One of my opening questions is: “Who here is going to die?”  This, inevitably, gets at least a few smiles and chuckles.  But why? It is not a funny sentiment; but it is an uncomfortable one.

Death is going to happen to us all.  We may be able to delay it or fight it, but each and every one of us will succumb to death’s grip in the end.  Statistics show that 55% of people do not have even the most rudimentary plan, such as a Last Will.  That means 100% of us will die, but only 45% are planning for the inevitable.

The conversation has to start.  It should not be a “back burner” issue, one to get to “tomorrow.”  Talking about death does not make it happen.  Talk to your loved ones, you family, your friends.  It is ok to talk about getting a plan in place.  It is ok to talk about what you would like to have happen when your time comes.

Let’s talk about death.  Let’s put your plan in place.  Then let’s not use it for years and years (have you ever noticed that it only rains when you forget your umbrella?).

We will help you with that conversation.  Make an appointment to meet with one of our estate planning attorneys, and let’s talk.

 jim-plitz Contributed by Morris Hall, PLLC Albuquerque, Santa Fe and Las Cruces Estate Planning Attorney and Partner, James P. Plitz.

About Morris Hall, PLLC:
At Morris Hall, PLLC we have focused our legal practice on estate planning for over 45 years.  Along with estate planning, our attorneys help clients and their families with matters of probate, trust administration, wills, power of attorneys, business planning, succession planning, legacy planning, charitable gifting and other important legal aspects.  We also have divisions in financial, real estate and accounting to help you incorporate all of your planning together, ensuring that everything works perfectly for your needs and situation. Our Arizona offices are located in Phoenix, Mesa, Scottsdale, Carefree, Tucson, Oro Valley, Prescott, Sedona, Flagstaff and Arrowhead.  Our New Mexico offices are located in Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Santa Fe.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

Do I need a Guardianship or Conservatorship Over My Mom?

By | Elder Care, Elder Law, Estate Planning, Guardianship | No Comments

We can’t make financial or health decisions for another person without proper planning or a court order.  This is true even for our closest of relatives – our parents, our adult children.

I recently met with “Bill” who explained that his 80 year old mother’s memory was deteriorating over the last 6 months. It is worse because Bill’s mother had hoarder tendencies.  Bill explained that his mother’s home was dangerous because she had kept every newspaper, magazine and financial statement she received over the past 40 years. Bill even noticed a pile of unopened bills and other mail on the kitchen counter.

Bill had talked with his mother about his concerns regarding her forgetfulness and safety, and she agreed that something just wasn’t right. Bill took his mother to her doctor and the doctor determined that she was not fit to make her own health and financial decisions.

Bill came to me to find out how he could help his mom with her living arrangements, as well as her finances.

Unfortunately Bill’s mother had never completed any estate planning documents, and because she lacked capacity, the only course of action to grant Bill the power to help would be to start on a court proceeding – a Guardianship/Conservatorship.  The court would rule who is in charge of the person (i.e. health decisions) via the Guardianship and who is charge of the finances via the Conservatorship.

The court process of a Guardianship and Conservatorship is time consuming, public, expensive and can be humiliating. The judge will appoint the person who has the best interest of Bill’s mother. For example, if Bill and his sister Susan want to each be their mother’s Guardian/Conservator, but do not want to act together, the judge, in his own opinion, will have to choose which one would act in the best interest of their mother. The cost of an average proceeding is approximately $5,000-$8,000.  Then on an annual basis, the appointed guardian and conservator is required to report to the court on the status of the incapacitated person – adding more cost.  All of this money is coming from the incapacitated person; money that can be better used caring for her.

If you are over the age of 18, you must have healthcare and financial powers of attorney nominating an agent who will handle your affairs – a person that you know and trust. If you fail to plan, your loved ones will be forced to initiate a Guardianship/Conservatorship proceeding should you become incapacitated before you pass away.

Call us today to meet with one of our estate planning attorneys to get your (or a family member’s) plan in place.

Wendy-Harn-Photo  Contributed by Morris Hall, PLLC Tucson and Oro Valley Estate Planning Attorney and Partner, Wendy W. Harn.

What the Attorneys of Morris Hall, PLLC Can Do For You:
The attorneys at Morris Hall have 100’s of years of combined experience ensuring that families’ assets are protected from probate, unnecessary taxes, creditors, ex-spouses and Medicaid spend-down.  Our Arizona offices are located in Phoenix, Mesa, Scottsdale, Carefree, Tucson, Oro Valley, Prescott, Flagstaff and Arrowhead.  Our New Mexico offices are located in Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Santa Fe.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

 

Disappearing Miles and Points. Can you transfer to your heirs?

By | Planning Ahead: One Week at a Time, Uncategorized | No Comments

Congratulations! You have just accumulated a great number of reward points with your holiday shopping, and your two recent airplane trips. Now what would happen to your frequent flier miles and credit card points should your demise occur? The answer depends upon which airline you have chosen, and which credit card you are using. They all have different policies.

 

The Points Guy helps to understand the different situations. Delta states that you can no longer transfer Sky Miles after one's passing. Delta deems that the miles are "not the property of any member, and thus may not be sold, attached, seized, levied upon, pledged, or transferred under any circumstances, including by operation of law upon death, or in connection with any domestic relations dispute and/or legal proceeding."

American Express Membership Rewards may be reinstated to a new basic account or be redeemed by the estate of the deceased Card Member. There are certain formalities that must be complied with. Be sure to contact the Member's Reward Division of American Express should a death occur. Chase allows an account to be taken over by a joint card member or an authorized user.  Points remain for usage if the account is taken over.

American Airlines for the most part says that mileage credit is not transferable, and may not be combined among members, their estates, successors, and assigns. United makes it impossible to transfer miles upon death, and  Southwest is also a definite no on transfer of miles. However, these airlines will not close an account, so if you have the deceased's membership information, you could use those points to book travel for anyone before those points expire (two years after demise).

British Airways outlines its policy, and essentially does not allow transfers, but there may be ways of using the points by following their procedures.

Hotel policies are pretty similar in terms of using points upon a death. Hilton states they cannot be transferred, and the Hyatt and Marriott follow the same rules The key to all of this is reading the various policies of the credit card companies, or airlines and  hotels. There may be ways for deceased members' families to use the points, provided you do not close the account prior to the usage upon a demise occurring.

 

It is important that you check with your credit card, airline, or other “point” program to know what happens to yours.  For those that allow to be passed on, charities like Make-A-Wish can use these unused miles to coordinate travel for their Wish-kids.

Details! Details! Be sure you take the time to understand your cardholder policies before you start earning.

ron-wilson  Contributed by Morris Hall, PLLC Phoenix Estate Planning Attorney and Partner, Ronald G. Wilson.

About Morris Hall, PLLC:
At Morris Hall, PLLC we have focused our legal practice on estate planning for over 45 years.  Along with estate planning, our attorneys help clients and their families with matters of probate, trust administration, wills, power of attorneys, business planning, succession planning, legacy planning, charitable gifting and other important legal aspects.  We also have divisions in financial, real estate and accounting to help you incorporate all of your planning together, ensuring that everything works perfectly for your needs and situation. Our Arizona offices are located in Phoenix, Mesa, Scottsdale, Carefree, Tucson, Oro Valley, Prescott, Sedona, Flagstaff and Arrowhead.  Our New Mexico offices are located in Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Santa Fe.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

Community Property. Is Arizona a Good State To Die In?

By | Estate taxes | No Comments

If you must choose between having your estate plan prepared in a community property state or a separate property state, you should choose community property every time. Arizona is one of only nine community property states. The other community property states are: 1) California, 2) Nevada, 3) New Mexico, 4) Idaho, 5) Washington, 6) Wisconsin, 7) Texas, and 8) Louisiana. The main reason to do your estate planning in a community property state is to minimize taxes.

There are all sorts of taxes that you need to be aware of when establishing an estate plan, they include income tax, inheritance tax, gift tax, estate tax, generation skipping transfer tax, state estate tax, excise tax, and capital gains tax. Doing your estate planning in a community property state can significantly decrease and often times even eliminate the amount of capital gains taxes when death occurs.

 

In a community property state, capital gains tax on community assets can be eliminated by receiving a full step up in tax basis when a loved one dies. I think an example would best illustrate what I mean by a step up in tax basis. Let’s assume that you and your spouse purchased some property in Arizona back in 1970 as an investment for $10,000.  That initial $10,000 payment is what the IRS calls your cost basis in the investment. Let’s say that same community asset is worth $110,000 today. Your original cost basis in the property is $10,000, but now that it has appreciated to $110,000, you have a $100,000 gain in the property. If you sell the property this year for $110,000, then you owe a capital gains tax on the $100,000 gain. In the alternative, had you not sold the property this year, but instead held on to it and died this year leaving it to your spouse, and then your spouse sold it for the $110,000, he/she would not have to pay any capital gains tax. In this scenario, the IRS would have allowed the surviving spouse to step up the cost basis in the property from the original $10,000 cost basis in 1970 to the date of death fair market value of $110,000, effectively wiping out any gain in the property.

How would this same scenario play out in any other state that is not a community property state? When the first spouse dies the surviving spouse only gets a half step up in tax basis on the property. Remember the original cost basis was $10,000 in 1970 and now today it is worth $110,000, which means a $100,000 gain. In a separate property state the survivor would only get a step up in basis on half the value ($50,000) and therefore would have to pay capital gains tax on the other half ($50,000). This is not great planning.

 

In addition to receiving a full step up in basis, Arizona currently does not have a state estate tax or inheritance tax. Although these tax advantages may change in the future, their present benefits make Arizona a great state to die in.

The attorneys at Morris Hall, PLLC have been practicing estate planning for over 40 years. We would love to help you create your estate plan in the wonderful Wild West state of Arizona.

dave-eastman  Contributed by Morris Hall, PLLC Arrowhead, Phoenix and Scottsdale Estate Planning Attorney and Partner, David T. Eastman.

What the Attorneys of Morris Hall, PLLC Can Do For You:
The attorneys at Morris Hall have 100’s of years of combined experience ensuring that families’ assets are protected from probate, unnecessary taxes, creditors, ex-spouses and Medicaid spend-down.  Our Arizona offices are located in Phoenix, Mesa, Scottsdale, Carefree, Tucson, Oro Valley, Prescott, Flagstaff and Arrowhead.  Our New Mexico offices are located in Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Santa Fe.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

 

Estate Planning and Taxes – One Size Fits All?

By | Estate Planning, Estate taxes | No Comments

Taxes are a big reason to plan.  But it is not the only reason.  The key thing is to have an estate plan that deals with the issues and goals that are personal to you.

Some people have taxable estates, and most will not. Some people have children, and some won’t.  Some people are not married, in relationships or on their fifth marriage, while others are in their one and only marriage.  An estate plan needs to be customized to fit each person’s particular situation.

Additionally, other factors such as federal and state taxes and asset protection must be considered when developing an estate plan.

Taxes impact all of us.  There are two main taxes that need to be considered are income tax and estate tax.  Income tax, including capital gains tax, hits the growth in your assets.  We pay this all the time.  With proper estate planning, these taxes can be mitigated, deferred or even wiped out altogether.  The estate tax issue has changed over the years, and currently, for most of us is a non-issue. In 1995, the federal estate tax exemption was only $600,000 per person. In 2016, the federal estate tax exemption is $5,450,000 per person. What this means is that if an individual’s estate at death is less than the exemption amount, there will be no tax imposed. With proper planning, the exemption is doubled for a married couple. So, in 2016, a married couple’s exemption is $10,900,000.

We hope our children are never sued, have to go through bankruptcy or get a divorce.  But that is not the society we live.  So a proper estate plan should incorporate asset protection.  Terms can be incorporated into your plan that protect what you leave to your loved so that they can use and enjoy it, not some greedy plaintiff.  Unfortunately we live in a litigious society and planning is necessary to ensure your hard earned estate is distributed to who you want, when you want, with the least possible expense and the greatest amount of privacy.

It is important to get the advice to have a customized plan put in place just for you.  If you already have an estate plan, come see one of our estate planning attorneys to have it reviewed – we tell our clients to review every three years. If you don’t have an estate plan, make an appointment today – now is the time to begin planning since we don’t know what tomorrow holds.

Wendy-Harn-Photo  Contributed by Morris Hall PLLC Tucson and Oro Valley Estate Planning Attorney and Partner, Wendy W. Harn.

Why Choose Morris Hall, PLLC:
You have a number of options when it comes to estate planning, so why pick Morris Hall?  First off, estate planning and asset protection are a very complicated endeavor and you should only trust someone who focuses exclusively on those matters.  Also, Morris Hall is a proud member of The American Academy of Estate Planning Attorneys (AAEPA) which provides us additional support, advanced training, tools and information that is not available to others – which means that we can better protect your assets and your loved ones.  We are one of only three firms in Arizona that belong to the AAEPA and are the only firm in New Mexico that has been granted membership.  If you have assets and loved ones that you want to protect, you are in good hands with Morris Hall.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

 

 

The Mastery of David Bowie

By | Celebrity Estates, Estate Planning, Other | No Comments

We lost one of the greatest singers and songwriters of any generation.  David Bowie succumbed to his fight with cancer on January 10th.  His voice and his lyrics resonate with millions of people.  But his mastery of music is only one area he is a genius.

David Bowie has written over 700 songs, and  sold 140 million albums, which makes it shocking to find out that he has ever encountered financial trouble.  But in the ‘70s David Bowie was at the brink of bankruptcy.  Though he was a masterful musician, the business side of the industry trapped him in “bad deals.”

This is not uncommon.  When we are young, we are more prone to making bad decisions, regardless of our aptitudes and our gifts.  But the key thing in the David Bowie story is that he did not let it keep him down, so when we lost him this week, he is said to have passed 135€ million to his wife Iman, and his two children.

What David Bowie did, we all can do.  He realized what he wanted to do – he wanted to leave his loved ones a legacy.   He got professional advice.  Consulting with professionals, they developed a plan to be able to return the entire inventory of songs to his control and ownership.  David Bowie did not know that he was going to die at such a young age.  But he knew that if he did, he wanted his loved ones to be cared for.

Most of us will never know what it is like to have hundreds of millions of dollars (unless you were one of the three Powerball winners on Wednesday night).  But we all can get professional help to formulate and implement a plan to help you achieve your goals.

Call us today to make an appointment with one of our estate planning attorneys so we can give you the advice and implement a plan designed for you.

 

jim-plitz  Contributed by Morris Hall PLLC Albuquerque, Santa Fe and Las Cruces Estate Planning Attorney and Partner, James P. Plitz.

Why Choose Morris Hall, PLLC:

You have a number of options when it comes to estate planning, so why pick Morris Hall?  First off, estate planning and asset protection are a very complicated endeavor and you should only trust someone who focuses exclusively on those matters.  Also, Morris Hall is a proud member of The American Academy of Estate Planning Attorneys (AAEPA) which provides us additional support, advanced training, tools and information that is not available to others – which means that we can better protect your assets and your loved ones.  We are one of only three firms in Arizona that belong to the AAEPA and are the only firm in New Mexico that has been granted membership.  If you have assets and loved ones that you want to protect, you are in good hands with Morris Hall.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

Christmas Present from Our Legislatures:

By | Attorney David Eastman, Estate Planning | No Comments

If you are philanthropically minded and want to make a charitable donation before the end of the year Congress just passed the Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes Act of 2015, which now makes it possible for you to contribute to a public charity of your choosing up to $100,000 from your IRA. There are some strings attached in order to take advantage of this wonderful gift Congress has given to us:

  • You must be 70 ½ or older;
  • You cannot give more than $100,000;
  • It must be to a public charity directly from your IRA;
  • It cannot come from a 401k or other retirement plan, unless you first move it to an IRA.

By making the charitable donation this way- directly from the IRA to the charity- you don’t have to realize on the income for income taxes purposes on the amount distributed to the charity and you would qualify for the charitable deduction.

So if you are in the spirit of giving during this time of year Congress has just given you a great opportunity to make a donation to your favorite charity from your IRA or Roth IRA.

If you miss out on taking advantage of this charitable donation this year- fear not- Congress made it applicable for not only 2015, but for all future years as well.

 

dave-eastman  Contributed by Morris Hall PLLC Phoenix, Arrowhead and Scottsdale Estate Planning Attorney and Partner, David T. Eastman.

About Morris Hall, PLLC:
At Morris Hall, PLLC we have focused our legal practice on estate planning for over 45 years.  Along with estate planning, our attorneys help clients and their families with matters of probate, trust administration, wills, power of attorneys, business planning, succession planning, legacy planning, charitable gifting and other important legal aspects.  We also have divisions in financial, real estate and accounting to help you incorporate all of your planning together, ensuring that everything works perfectly for your needs and situation. Our Arizona offices are located in Phoenix, Mesa, Scottsdale, Carefree, Tucson, Oro Valley, Prescott, Sedona, Flagstaff and Arrowhead.  Our New Mexico offices are located in Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Santa Fe.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

 

A Life with Alzheimer’s

By | Estate Planning, Estate taxes, Other | No Comments

Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia have a devastating impact on people’s lives.  According to the World Alzheimer Report 2015, there are over 46 million people suffering from dementia.  That is a staggering figure.  Even worse is the future view – it is estimated that there will be over 131 million people suffering from dementia by the year 2050.

Thankfully, I have not had to experience, first hand, the emotional impacts of living with or suffering through dementia.  It takes the strength of Hercules to be the support and the stability for a loved one suffering from the disease.  I recently read an article by CNN discussing one man’s struggle as he was diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer’s.  The article imparts interesting insight into the mindset of those whose memories are fading.  Alarmingly, most people do not consult with their doctors as warning signs emerge.

As an estate planning attorney, I see the struggles of families trying to do what is best for their loved ones.  Many times, it is the person suffering who is the biggest hurdle.  He or she is gripping onto the control they once knew, and the fear of losing it makes them grip tighter; they almost become their own worst enemy.

As I put together estate plans that help give legal authority for a trusted friend or family member to step in to assist in these times, I try to emphasize and remind my clients to “store these thoughts” as to the “why” and the “when” their son or daughter will step in to help them.  I stress that the plan is in place to help make that difficult time easier by allowing the person they chose to continue to pay bills and find the care and support they need to continue to live their life.

It is a difficult time.  I hope that I am fortunate enough to not have to experience it firsthand.  I am thankful that each of my family members have a plan in place so we will be able to legally support each other if Alzheimer’s befalls any one of us.

Make sure your plan is in place.  Getting the right advice and having the right pieces in your plan is critical to making that difficult time just a little easier.  Call us today, and one of our estate planning attorneys will review and discuss what you need in your plan.

 jim-plitz Contributed by Morris Hall PLLC Albuquerque, Santa Fe and Las Cruces Estate Planning Attorney and Partner, James P. Plitz.

What the Attorneys of Morris Hall, PLLC Can Do For You:
The attorneys at Morris Hall have 100’s of years of combined experience ensuring that families’ assets are protected from probate, unnecessary taxes, creditors, ex-spouses and Medicaid spend-down.  Our Arizona offices are located in Phoenix, Mesa, Scottsdale, Carefree, Tucson, Oro Valley, Prescott, Flagstaff and Arrowhead.  Our New Mexico offices are located in Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Santa Fe.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

 

 

Wishing You and Yours the Best of Holidays

By | Holidays | No Comments

happy-holidays-2015 small

More than at any other time of year, the holidays bring our friends and families together to share with one another the joys of the season.  Past memories are shared and new ones created.  While we realize conversations might not discuss estate planning, it is at these times that planning ahead becomes clearer.  Our family, friends and the legacies that we leave behind, are the basic reasons most of us have created an estate plan.

 

Most families don’t get regular opportunities to meet together, especially as the family grows and each of your children now have their own children.  Take this special time together to discuss the future and ensure your legacy is carried on according to your wishes.  And, above all, make sure to express your love, appreciation and hopes for them.  Those are the memories that they will cherish forever.

 

Happy holidays to you and yours, from the entire Morris Hall family!

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