Alzheimer's Archives - Morris Hall, PLLC

The Documents You Need in Case of Incapacity or Illness

By | Healthcare documents | No Comments

IncapacityOne of the most vulnerable, and most feared, states of being is incapacity- to be unable to communicate one’s thoughts or wishes with respect to crucial medical decisions.  Cases such as Terry Schaivo’s have also brought to light the kind of turmoil, devastation, and costly litigation the absence of a plan can wreak upon the family of an incapacitated individual.  While there are forces beyond our control that can affect our health and capacity, thoughtful planning can assure that, in the event of incapacity, our wishes are respected.  Creation of the following four documents work toward avoidance of the panoply of issues that surround incapacitation:

  1.  A medical power of attorney is a document that allows you to appoint a trusted family member or friend to make medical decisions for you in the event you become incapacitated.
  2. A mental health power of attorney is a document that allows for the appointment of a trusted family member or friend to make decisions for you in the event that you are incapable of making decisions yourself due to an illness such as Alzheimer’s or dementia.
  3.  HIPAA, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, is a Federal law that sets rules and limitations on who can look at your medical records or receive your health information.  A HIPAA authorization allows you to name the individuals who can access your medical information.  This document generally allows release of information from your health care provider or insurance company to those persons you specified.
  4.  A living will, or healthcare directive to physicians, is a document that allows you to inform medical personnel of your wishes with respect to the use of artificial methods to extend your life in the event you are diagnosed with a terminal or irreversible condition.  A living will is used in the event that you are unable to communicate your wishes due to some form of incapacity.

All these documents are essential to making sure your wishes are followed in the event you are unable to competently communicate.  The proper execution of these healthcare documents also provides piece of mind, comfort, and guidance to your loved ones.

For more information, schedule a free consultation to speak with one of our estate planning attorneys by calling 888.222.1328 today!

Andrea ClausContributed by MH Phoenix Estate Planning Attorney Andrea Claus

Why Choose Morris Hall:
You have a number of options when it comes to estate planning, so why pick Morris Hall?  First off, estate planning and asset protection are a very complicated endeavor and you should only trust someone who focuses exclusively on those matters.  Also, MH is a proud member of The American Academy of Estate Planning Attorneys (AAEPA) which provides us additional support, advanced training, tools and information that is not available to others – which means that we can better protect your assets and your loved ones.  We are one of only two firms in Arizona that belong to the AAEPA and are the only firm in New Mexico that has been granted membership.  If you have assets and loved ones that you want to protect, you are in good hands with MH.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

A Few Success Stories of Life Care Consultants

By | Elder Care, Life Care Consultants, Life Care Planning | One Comment

Life Care Consultants provides decision making assistance and direction for those facing life changing situations especially as related to aging.  Every person's situation is different, and as such, each of our plans meets with your specific needs.  We take the time to get to know you, your current situation and circumstances, the struggles and changes you are facing, and how you want your future to be.  We then use our expertise and associations to find you the best possible care and direction.

Here are a few success stories from our actual clients (all names have been changed).

Barbara is in the early stages of dementia and she and her family were very concerned about her future.  She lives at home and works closely with her two daughters who luckily live nearby.  We worked with Barbara to create a plan that allows her to know exactly what steps to take whenever she needs assistance.  She now also has a path set forward to provide her with the best possible future.

Henry and Wanda are in a different situation than most.  Henry is in the advanced stages of dementia and will be moving in to an excellent care facility within the next month.  The couple's only daughter lives several hundred miles away.  However, we were able to coordinate all aspects of the decision to allow Wanda and their daughter to participate in the selection of the facility - giving them peace of mind knowing Henry will be well taken care of.  Once Henry has moved, we will continue to work with Wanda to make sure that her adjustment is as seamless as possible.

Hope is 90 years old and has no living relatives to assist her.  Even at her advanced age she is remarkably alert and mentally capable.  In fact, she still manages her own finances while living in an assisted living facility.  We helped her move our of her apartment about a year ago when her sister passed away.  Hope has faced the transition with enthusiasm and confidence and we are grateful to have been a part of ensuring she was happily placed in a great facility.

We would be happy to meet with you and discover how we can help you to get through difficult aging transitions with the greatest amount of peace, security and ease.

Glenda Wilkes, Life Care ConsultantsContributed by Life Care Consultants' CEO Dr. Glenda Wilkes

About Morris Hall:
At Morris Hall, we have focused our legal practice on estate planning for over 40 years.  Along with estate planning, our attorneys help clients and their families with matters of probate, trust administration, wills, power of attorneys, business planning, succession planning, legacy planning, charitable gifting and other important legal aspects.  We also have divisions in financial, real estate and accounting to help you incorporate all of your planning together, ensuring that everything works perfectly for your needs and situation. Our Arizona offices are located in Phoenix, Mesa, Scottsdale, Cave Creek, Tucson, Prescott, Flagstaff and Arrowhead.  Our New Mexico offices are located in Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Santa Fe.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

Take Control of Your Health Care Decisions

By | Healthcare documents | No Comments

Most of us that have created an estate plan have a living will that tells our loved ones and the doctors our wishes regarding life support so we don’t have to suffer the indecency that someone like Teri Schiavo did.

Most of us also have health care powers of attorney that nominate someone to make our physical health care decisions for us if we cannot make those decisions on our own.  But the one document most people fail to have as part of their estate plan is called a mental health care power of attorney, otherwise known as a psychiatric advance directive.

According to the Alzheimer's Association one in eight elderly Americans has Alzheimer’s.  It is one of the leading diseases for the elderly today.  It is now more important than ever before that you make sure your voice is able to be heard regarding your mental health care decisions when you are no longer able to communicate those desires.

If you do not wish to have electric shock treatment or certain medications administered to you, it is imperative that you have that written in your mental health care power of attorney document.

It is no longer sufficient to simply have a health care power of attorney.  In Arizona there is an artificial distinction between what is considered health care and what is considered mental health care. It is important that you have both a health care power of attorney and a mental health care power of attorney in place to ensure that your wishes regarding both aspects of your health care are known.

Without a mental health care power of attorney, your loved ones, including your health care power of attorney agent, will not be able to commit you to an acute-care mental health facility.  If you are causing harm to yourself and others and you have not executed a mental health care power of attorney, your loved ones will need to get a court order allowing them to commit you to the mental health facility.  This can be a very expensive, time consuming and humiliating process, which is all played out in front of the public.

The documents that you should have in place to ensure that all of your medical rights and desires are made known consist of a health care power of attorney, a living will, a HIPAA form, and a mental health care power of attorney. These documents should be updated at least every three to four years.

Don’t leave it up to the health care profession and the courts to determine how you should be treated if you are no longer able to make your own decisions.  Take control of your health care decisions, both mental and physical, by making your wishes and rights known.

Estate Planning, Attorney, Lawyer, Arrowhead, Prescott, FlagstaffContributed by MH Estate Planning Attorney for Prescott and Flagstaff, David T. Eastman

What the Attorneys of Morris Hall Can Do For You:
The attorneys at Morris Hall have 100’s of years of combined experience ensuring that families’ assets are protected from probate, unnecessary taxes, creditors, ex-spouses and Medicaid spend-down.  The attorneys also help those in Arizona and New Mexico to apply for and receive Medicaid assistance and Veterans Benefits.  Our Arizona offices are located in Phoenix, Mesa, Scottsdale, Tucson, Prescott, Flagstaff and Arrowhead.  Our New Mexico offices are located in Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Santa Fe.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

Former Ice Skater with Dementia Makes Unexplained Donations

By | Celebrity Estates, Elder Care, Estate Planning | No Comments

Susan Strong Davis, an 87 year old widow suffering from dementia, lives in Palos Verdes Estates in California.  She is tended regularly by nurse’s aids as her dementia is so far progressed as to prevent her from caring for herself or making decisions on her own behalf.  However, apparently some decisions ARE being made on her behalf, decisions involving large sums of money…

Davis’ funds are held in a trust and are under the care of her longtime financial advisor, John E. Larkin.  Apparently, Larkin has been very busy allocating large amounts of money in Davis’ account to matters that seem in no way connected to Davis.  In fact, “Davis” has apparently purchased land in Beverly Hills and has borrowed millions to build a four-bedroom home with three fireplaces and a pool.  She has also seemingly donated over $600,000 to the Kabbalah Centre.  The Kabbalah Centre is a controversial organization originally brought into public awareness due to Madonna’s devoted membership and her service as the organization’s board chair.  The Kabbahal Center is currently under investigation by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) for mismanagement of their vast funds.

Davis seems to have no connection with the religion, and her relatives describe her as adamantly non-religious.  In recent visits, David had never mentioned any new religious affiliations, nor that she was, apparently, building a home in Beverly Hills.  If she were lucid enough to oversee these transactions, it seems unlikely that she would not mention such life-changing events to visiting loved ones.

Larkin on the other hand is highly involved with the Kabbalah Centre and has been a devout member since the early 2000s.  In fact, Larkin was also put in charge of the organization’s finances.  Considering the IRS investigation regarding the use of those finances, he may be handling their funds in a similar manner to Davis’.

As far as the Beverly Hills home is concerned, this is ironically (or not so ironically) located right by the Kabbalah Centre and is only a block from Larkin’s current home.  It also features a kosher kitchen, even though Davis is not Jewish…but Larkin is!  Another concern is that the home is built on a lot previously owned by Larkin and sold to Davis at a substantial profit over what Larkin originally paid for it, even in a depreciated market.  This all has occurred to a woman whose dementia prohibits her from functioning properly or making vital decisions.

While Larkin is under investigation for his actions, he has yet to be charged with a crime.  However, it seems clear that he has mismanaged Davis’ assets for his own personal gain.    A sad example of financial elder abuse.

It is tragic, but we see it happen far too often where the elderly are taken advantage of, especially those suffering from dementia or Alzheimer’s.  Make certain you assign trustworthy individuals to manage your affairs on your behalf.  We never know when the time may come that we are left incapacitated.  For this reason, it is imperative to plan today for whatever tomorrow may hold.

Morris Hall Can Protect You in Today’s Litigious Society:
We live in a litigious society, where over 1 million lawsuits are filed every year in America alone.  Financial predators are looking for ways to take funds from others and often use litigation as their means to do so.  At Morris Hall we provide your assets and your loved ones with important protections that can prevent financial predators from taking advantage of you.  We do this through proper and current estate planning techniques.  With an MH living trust, we can also protect your property, assets and loved ones from probate, estate taxes, gift taxes, creditors, Medicaid spend-down, conservatorship or guardianship proceedings, ex-spouses and more.  A living trust also keeps your asset and beneficiary information private and secure to avoid giving financial predators information to use against you and your family.  Without a living trust, this information will be made public.  For those living in Arizona, we serve the areas of Phoenix, Mesa, Gilbert, Fountain Hills, Scottsdale, Prescott, Flagstaff, Sedona, Tucson, Sonoita, Arrowhead, Avondale, Goodyear and Tempe.  In New Mexico we serve the areas of Albuquerque, Santa Fe, Las Cruces, Rio Rancho, White Rock, Alamogordo, Truth or Consequences and more.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment with an attorney in your area!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

Alzheimer’s at 59? Tucson Attorney Asks, "What Would You Do?"

By | Celebrity Estates, Estate Planning, Life Care Consultants, Life Care Planning | No Comments

Pat Summit, Women's Basketball Coach, Alzheimer's DiseaseThis week, Pat Summitt, the head women’s basketball coach at Tennessee, and the coach with the most wins in college basketball history, announced she is stepping down. Ten months ago, Pat was diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer’s disease. After 38 years as head coach, Pat will continue to be involved with the Lady Vols basketball program as “head coach emeritus,” but has officially turned over the coaching responsibilities to her long-time assistant coach.

So, what’s in store for Pat and her family as they deal with Alzheimer’s? That’s hard to tell, but there are a few things that are certain. First, Alzheimer’s is a progressive condition, which means Pat’s condition will worsen over time. Already, Alzheimer’s has affected Pat’s personal and professional life: Where she was once able to manage the high pressure and quickly changing responsibilities on game day, Alzheimer’s has made it impossible for her to function in that responsibility. In the future, she will most likely need assistance with even some of her day to day activities, such as dressing and bathing, preparing her food, and managing her finances.

Second, Pat fortunately has a strong support system of family and loved ones who are able to help as needed. Unlike many Americans, she also has the financial resources to pay for the services and assistance that her family and friends can’t provide.  Those of us without those funds need to find other resources to cover the expensive costs of long-term care.

Early onset Alzheimer’s makes up approximately five percent of those 4 million Americans suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. What if you, or someone you love, were part of that 4 million? Are you prepared?

You can start preparing now by going through the questions listed below.  Take the time to thoughtfully answer each question, and share your answers with your family. If you find the answers lacking, start today to find the resources and assistance you may need in the coming months and years.

  1. Am I being treated by a physician who is knowledgeable about Alzheimer’s disease and who treats me and not my disease?
  2. Do I have a supportive network of family members and/or friends who are willing and able to assist me with managing my personal, legal and financial matters?
  3. Have I arranged for someone to have the legal authority to manage my personal needs and care once I am no longer able to make those decisions?
  4. Do my family members know my desires regarding care treatment that I do or do not want as my disease progresses?
  5. Do my family members know what resources are available in my community to help them manage my care and allow me to have the best quality of life?
  6. Have I made arrangements for someone to have the legal authority to handle my financial affairs without costly and difficult court intervention?
  7. Do I have the financial resources to pay for my care without depriving my family of resources they need?
  8. Have I planned for family members to take advantage of all resources, public and private, which will help provide and pay for services I will need through the progress of my disease?
  9. Do I have contingency plans in case the people I depend on for care are unable or unwilling to help when needed?

At Morris Hall, our hope is that you will never know the pain and uncertainty that comes when you or a loved one are diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease, or any of the other debilitating chronic diseases. We know the reality is that many of our clients and their families will have to face these serious medical conditions head on. That is why we have experienced elder law attorneys, case managers and other professionals with years of experience helping clients and their families navigate the complex maze of legal, social, financial, medical and personal choices that will inevitably arise. Talk to us if you have questions or need direction, but don’t wait. Start preparing today!

 

What the Attorneys of Morris Hall Can Do For You:
The attorneys at Morris Hall have 100’s of years of combined experience ensuring that families’ assets are protected from probate, unnecessary taxes, creditors, ex-spouses and Medicaid spend-down.  The attorneys also help those in Arizona and New Mexico to apply for and receive Medicaid assistance and Veterans Benefits.  Our Arizona offices are located in Phoenix, Mesa, Scottsdale, Tucson, Prescott, Flagstaff and Arrowhead.  Our New Mexico offices are located in Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Santa Fe.  Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

This blog should be used for informational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice.  If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

Dementia - What It Is and What To Do About It

By | Healthcare documents | No Comments

 

Dementia diseases are one of the most common and debilitating diseases for those over 60 years of age. In general, dementia is an irreversible and degenerative disease - meaning that it gets worse over time.

Dementia can lessen one's ability to process and retain information, problem-solve, complete multi-step tasks and can even cause changes in personality and unusual behavior. The risk of Dementia increases with age and is rarely seen in people under 60 years old.

There are various types of Dementia, with the most common being Alzheimer's disease. Other forms include Vascular Dementia, Dementia with Lewy Bodies, Frontotemporal Dementia, Creutz-Jakob disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease and a few others that are less common.

Common Signs and Symptoms

- Memory loss, especially affecting short-term memory
- Difficulties with language and communication
- Deteriorating cognitive skills (such as calculation, abstract thought, judgment)
- Getting lost at familiar places or on familiar routes
- Personality changes and diminishing social skills
- Loss of interest in favorite hobbies and activities
- Difficulty with common and familiar tasks
- Poor judgment, especially worrisome in dangerous situations

Prevention and Treatment

So far, knowledge on the treatment, cause and prevention of dementia is very limited. Currently there is no cure and no definitive known cause. Some treatments are available which target the specific symptoms of dementia, but most have shown minimal results. Treatments can also vary depending on the type of dementia.

As there is no known cause, methods of prevention are highly speculative. It is always recommended that one eat healthy, exercise and avoid habits that negatively affect ones health in order to lesson the odds of later developing a wide variety of diseases, including Dementia.

What to Do Now?

If you or a loved one are suffering from any form of Dementia, there are some important steps to take.

1. See your physician for an official diagnosis. Be sure to ask questions and get as much information as you can from your practitioner.

2. Make a plan for the future that entails who will serve as a caretaker; would in-home assistance or a nursing home be preferred; how to pay for care; who to designate for important legal, financial and healthcare decisions.

3. Get all legal affairs in order.

Getting Legal Affairs in Order

During the course of Dementia, mental functioning continues to deteriorate, creating an ever increasing need for support and assistance. It is imperative that one or more persons are selected to handle financial, medical, healthcare and other important decisions on the behalf of the individual suffering from dementia.

Setting up a Power of Attorney (POA), Healthcare Power of Attorney (HPOA) a Living Will and a HIPAA document are imperative. For superior protection of a loved one and their assets a living trust should also be created. These various documents are crucial for ensuring that your loved one is taken care of and that trustworthy individuals are legally designated to handle important affairs.

Morris Hall (MH) has focused on estate planning for forty years and can help guide you and your loved one in the direction that will best help you prepare for the road ahead. Our attorneys and our life care specialists can help you with everything from legal planning, financial assistance, help for caregivers, additional resources and more.

Find out more information and schedule a free consultation by calling 888.222.1328 or visiting us online at Morristrust.com.

 

This blog should be used for informational purposes only. It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice. If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

 

Largest Transfer of Wealth in US History

By | Estate Planning | No Comments

In the next 50 years the United States will see the largest transfer of wealth in history. More than $20 trillion will be transferred from the Depression-era generation to their Baby-Boomer children. This creates an interesting dynamic in that the Depression-era generation valued frugality, whereas their Baby-Boomer children, at times, relish instant gratification.

There may be some Baby-Boomers out there who are expecting to inherit their parents golden nest egg, but the reality is that without proper planning in place their parents may have very little to pass on down to their children. The number of Americans age 65 and older has topped over 40 million. That is the most in U.S. history. By the year 2050 it is estimated that the 65 plus population will make up 1/5th of the U.S. population.

The good news is that advances in health care have increased our longevity, but the bad news is that half of those living over 85 years old will have Alzheimer's. If you have Alzheimer's Disease, you will need some form of long term care, which can be very expensive. The average cost of care today in Arizona and New Mexico is $6,500 a month. That cost is only going to increase in the years to come. The other issue is that most investments are not keeping pace with the increase in the cost of care. This means that it is highly likely that one will run out of funds very quickly just paying for their cost of care in the future.

There is a mistaken belief that Medicare will cover your long term needs. This is incorrect. Medicare will only cover a very short amount of time for your long term care needs and then you are left to your own devices to cover your cost of care.

There are things that can be done now to properly plan for the day when you may need long term care. There are instruments that can be used to ensure that your needs are being taken care of and that there is a legacy left to your loved ones when you pass away. The key is to have the plan in place before hand.

I always ask my clients, when is the best time to plan for a storm? Is it when you are in the middle of the storm? We all know the answer to this question. We know that the storm is coming, we all know that we are going to get older. We know that with advances in medicine we will be living longer. We know that there is no cure for Dementia or Alzheimer's. We know that the cost of care is increasing every year. We have two options, either we prepare now and plan for the storm as best we can or we wait until it is upon us and hope for the best.

The attorneys at MH are experts in planning for the worst, which allows our clients to have peace of mind and alleviates the unnecessary anxiety about what will happen when the storm of life is upon them. Our goal is to ensure that this massive transfer of wealth occurring in the next 40 years is passed to your loved ones and not used up on expensive long term care costs, probate fees, the IRS, lawyers, or anyone else that may feel they are entitled to your legacy. Please call our law firm today at 888.222.1328 for a free consultation to discuss how we can help you prepare for tomorrow's storm.

Why Choose Morris Hall:

You have a number of options when it comes to estate planning, so why pick Morris Hall? First off, estate planning and asset protection are a very complicated endeavor and you should only trust someone who focuses exclusively on those matters. Also, MH is a proud member of The American Academy of Estate Planning Attorneys (AAEPA) which provides us additional support, advanced training, tools and information that is not available to others - which means that we can better protect your assets and your loved ones. We are one of only two firms in Arizona that belong to the AAEPA and are the only firm in New Mexico that has been granted membership. If you have assets and loved ones that you want to protect, you are in good hands with MH. Contact us today at 888.222.1328 to schedule an appointment!

Contributed by MH attorney David T. Eastman

This blog should be used for informational purposes only. It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice. If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation.

Alzheimer's Disease - What It Is and What Can Be Done About It

By | Life Care Consultants, Life Care Planning | No Comments

Alzheimer's disease is a progressive and degenerative disease which affects the brain, causing difficulties with memory, behavior and the gradual loss of multiple mental functions and abilities. It is estimated that as many as 5.1 million American's currently suffer from Alzheimer's disease, making it the sixth leading cause of death in the United States.

The disease is the result of the destruction and death of nerve cells, causing memory failure, personality changes, problems carrying out daily activities and other symptoms. Biopsies of those who have died from Alzheimer's show amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain as well as the loss of connections between nerve cells (neurons) - all of which explain the degeneration of the brain's capabilities to function properly during the course of Alzheimer's disease.

Common Signs and Symptoms

- Memory Loss

- Difficulties with language and communication

- Misplacing items

- Getting lost at familiar places or on familiar routes

- Personality changes and diminishing social skills

- Loss of interest in favorite hobbies and activities

- Difficulty with common and familiar tasks

- Poor judgment

- Difficulty with daily activities

Prevention and Treatment

So far, knowledge on the treatment, cause and prevention of Alzheimer's disease is very limited. Currently there is no cure and no definitive known cause. Generally treatments focus on attempting to slow the progression of the disease, manage behavior problems and symptoms such as confusion, sleep problems and agitation.

As there is no known cause, methods of prevention are highly speculative. It is always recommended that one eat healthy, exercise and avoid habits that negatively affect ones health in order to lesson the odds of later developing Alzheimer's. However, there is no concrete proof that these methods or any other methods will prevent the disease.

What to Do Now?

If you or a loved one are suffering from Alzheimer's, there are some important steps to take.

1. See your physician for an official diagnosis. Be sure to ask questions and get as much information as you can from your practitioner.

2. Make a plan for the future that entails who will serve as a caretaker; would in-home assistance or a nursing home be preferred; how to pay for care; who to designate for important legal, financial and healthcare decisions.

3. Get all legal affairs in order.

Getting Legal Affairs in Order

During the course of Alzheimer's, mental functioning continues to deteriorate, creating an ever increasing need for support and assistance. It is imperative that one or more persons are selected to handle financial, medical, healthcare and other important decisions on the behalf of the individual suffering from Alzheimer's.

Setting up a Power of Attorney (POA), Healthcare Power of Attorney (HPOA) a Living Will and a HIPAA document are imperative. For superior protection of a loved one and their assets, a living trust should also be created. These various documents are crucial for ensuring that your loved one is taken care of and that trustworthy individuals are legally designated to handle important affairs.

Morris Hall (MH) has focused on estate planning for forty years and can help guide you and your loved one in the direction that will best help you prepare for the road ahead. Our attorneys and our life care specialists can help you with everything from legal planning, financial assistance, help for caregivers, additional resources and more.

Find out more information and schedule a free consultation by calling 888.222.1328 or visiting us online at morristrust.com.

This blog should be used for informational purposes only. It does not create an attorney-client relationship with any reader and should not be construed as legal advice. If you need legal advice, please contact an attorney in your community who can assess the specifics of your situation. 
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